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Respiratory correlated cone beam CT
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10.1118/1.1869074
/content/aapm/journal/medphys/32/4/10.1118/1.1869074
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aapm/journal/medphys/32/4/10.1118/1.1869074
View: Figures

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Motion artifacts in 3D CT scans of a moving spherical phantom. The upper part, depicting a transverse (a) and sagittal slice (b) of a single slice helical CT scan, shows that each transverse slice is almost artifact free, while there is a clear slice by sagittal view. The lower part, depicting a CBCT scan, shows a blurring of the moving object in both the transverse (c) and sagittal view (d) caused by the slow gantry rotation speed compared to the motion period.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Schematic representation of the central transverse slice of the contrast detail phantom (a) and several CBCT reconstructions of this phantom (b)–(f) based on different number of projections, where denotes the number of projections and the corresponding gantry angle increment per projection.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Measured CNR for the cylindrical insert with for different number of projections. The solid line represents the theoretical relationship between CNR and the number of projections fitted to the data points.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Displacement of the spherical phantom obtained from fluoroscopy for the 3 s (upper figure) and 5 s (lower figure) period in the superior-inferior direction, where the maxima represent the most superior position (peak-exhale) and the minima represent the most inferior position (peak-inhale). The grey curve represents the regular motion while the back curve represents the irregular motion.

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Central sagittal slice of the 4D CBCT reconstruction of the moving phantom (5 s period, regular motion) for eight phases (radians) of the motion cycle. The series reveals the trajectory of the phantom and indicates that the quality of the reconstruction depends on the residual motion.

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Position of the sphere’s center of gravity (COG) for the fluoroscopic data and eight phases of the motion cycle obtained by 4D CBCT for both the 3 and 5 s period and the regular as well as the irregular motion. The COGs obtained from the 4D CBCT data are positioned closely to the trajectory obtained from fluoroscopy. For some phase bins, phase shifts occur compared to the predicted phase from fluoroscopy (indicated by the dashed lines).

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

Central sagittal slices of the spherical phantom in the peak-inhale, mid-exhale, and peak-inhale phase/position for the static situation and for both the 3 and 5 s periods and the regular as well as the irregular motion.

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

Central transverse slices of the spherical phantom in the peak-inhale, mid-exhale, and peak-inhale phase/position for the static situation and for both the 3 and 5 s periods and the regular as well as the irregular motion.

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

Extracted breathing signal for three patients, where the maxima represent the peak-exhale phase and the minima represent the peak-inhale phase.

Image of FIG. 10.
FIG. 10.

Sagittal, coronal, and transverse slices of patient I depicting the 3D CBCT scan and the peak-exhale, mid-inhale, peak-inhale, and mid-exhale phases of the 4D CBCT scan.

Image of FIG. 11.
FIG. 11.

Sagittal, coronal, and transverse slices of patient II depicting the 3D CBCT scan and the peak-exhale, mid-inhale, peak-inhale, and mid-exhale phases of the 4D CBCT scan.

Image of FIG. 12.
FIG. 12.

Sagittal, coronal, and transverse slices of patient III depicting the 3D CBCT scan and the peak-exhale, mid-inhale, peak-inhale, and mid-exhale phases of the 4D CBCT scan.

Image of FIG. 13.
FIG. 13.

Profiles along the intersection of the coronal and sagittal planes shown in Figs. 10–12. In the 4D scans, the contrast is considerably higher and boundaries of the tumor are better defined.

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/content/aapm/journal/medphys/32/4/10.1118/1.1869074
2005-03-30
2014-04-23
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Respiratory correlated cone beam CT
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aapm/journal/medphys/32/4/10.1118/1.1869074
10.1118/1.1869074
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