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Bioengineering and Imaging Research Opportunities Workshop V: A white paper on imaging and characterizing structure and function in native and engineered tissues
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10.1118/1.2948317
/content/aapm/journal/medphys/35/8/10.1118/1.2948317
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aapm/journal/medphys/35/8/10.1118/1.2948317
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Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Clinical application areas for diseased tissues.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Biological principles and design of engineered tissues (courtesy of Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic, Columbia University, New York, NY).

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Magnetic resonance elastography. (Left) A conventional magnetic resonance image of the upper abdomen reveals no abnormality. (Center) A special magnetic resonance imaging technique is used to image propagating shear waves that are generated in the upper abdomen. The shear wave images are processed to generate a quantitative image of tissue stiffness. (Right) This elastogram reveals that the stiffness of the liver is approximately 8 kPa, which is much higher than the normal value of 2 kPa, indicating the presence of severe hepatic fibrosis, a condition that has traditionally required liver biopsy for diagnosis (from Richard L. Ehman).

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Optical microprobes have the potential to distinguish normal tissue from multicellular aggregates of cancer cells. The challenge is to develop this potential into technologies capable of delineating the margins of tumors for surgical extraction and radiation treatment (courtesy of Dr. Alexander Meining, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich, Germany).

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

In vivo distribution of -labeled chemotherapeutic nanoliposomes can be imaged and quantified via microSPECT/CT and planar scintigraphic imaging. MicroSPECT imaging is useful for monitoring whole body distribution as well as the intratumoral distribution of lipid nanoparticles (from X. Garcia-Rojas, A. Bao, G. D. Dodd III, C. Santoyo, R. Perez, B. Goins, and W. Phillips. MicroSPECT/CT Imaging of Intratumoral Distribution and Retention Following Intratumoral Delivery of Radiolabeled Liposomes in a Human Solid Tumor Xenograft. Abstract—Joint Molecular Imaging Conference; Academy of Molecular Imaging and the Society for Molecular Imaging. Providence, RI, September 2007).

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/content/aapm/journal/medphys/35/8/10.1118/1.2948317
2008-07-08
2014-04-19
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Bioengineering and Imaging Research Opportunities Workshop V: A white paper on imaging and characterizing structure and function in native and engineered tissues
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aapm/journal/medphys/35/8/10.1118/1.2948317
10.1118/1.2948317
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