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Multidivergent-beam stationary cardiac SPECT
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10.1118/1.3134245
/content/aapm/journal/medphys/36/7/10.1118/1.3134245
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aapm/journal/medphys/36/7/10.1118/1.3134245
View: Figures

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Parameters in pinhole and divergent-beam systems.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Additional view angles are created by multipinhole and multidivergent-beam systems. (a) The multipinhole system creates an additional view angle . (b) The multidivergent-beam system creates an additional view-angle . (c) If a multidivergent-beam system is positioned in 3 non-overlapping locations, it can cover over 180° of view-angles.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

A divergent-beam collimator is compared to a pinhole collimator in terms of (a) resolution and (b) sensitivity for an image reduction and distance to the .

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Computer simulations setup: (a) The multidivergent-beam system and (b) the multipinhole system. Both systems have the same heart-to-collimator distance and same image reduction factor (0.5).

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Computer simulations results. The first row compares the angular sampling effects of (a) the multidivergent-beam system and (b) the multipinhole system. The second row compares the noise effects in (c) the multidivergent-beam system and (d) the multipinhole system. Note: In (a) and (b), the grayscale display widow is shifted down on purpose in order to show the background artifacts.

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

The procedure to convert a fan-beam collimator into a multidivergent-beam collimator. (a) A fan-beam collimator. (b) The upside-down collimator. (c) The divergent-beam collimator is partitioned into three sections. (d) The three sections are separated. (e) The three sections are rearranged in the reversed order and glued together to form a multidivergent-beam collimator.

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

The procedure to convert a cone-beam collimator into a multidivergent-beam collimator. (a) A cone-beam collimator. (b) The upside-down collimator. (c) The divergent-beam collimator is partitioned into seven sections. (d) The seven sections are separated, rearranged in the reversed order, and glued together to form a multidivergent-beam collimator.

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

(a) The middle row of subcollimators provides relative view angles of , 0, and . (b) The top row of subcollimators provides relative view angles of and . (c) All three rows provide the relative view angles of , , 0, , and . (d) Using three detector positions, a 180° view angle can be covered.

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

(a) Representation of the dead areas in a multidivergent-beam collimator. (b) The multiplexing problem associated with a multipinhole collimator.

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/content/aapm/journal/medphys/36/7/10.1118/1.3134245
2009-06-09
2014-04-21
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Multidivergent-beam stationary cardiac SPECT
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aapm/journal/medphys/36/7/10.1118/1.3134245
10.1118/1.3134245
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