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Simple analytical models of gravitational collapse
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10.1119/1.2117187
/content/aapt/journal/ajp/73/12/10.1119/1.2117187
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aapt/journal/ajp/73/12/10.1119/1.2117187
View: Figures

Figures

Image of Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.

(a) A thin light shell falls into a black hole to produce a larger black hole, (b) a thin light shell with flat Minkowski interior collapses to form a black hole.

Image of Fig. 2.
Fig. 2.

(a) A discrete sequence of light shells forms a black hole, (b) the continuous version of the same process.

Image of Fig. 3.
Fig. 3.

Some “outgoing” light rays in the thick light shell collapse. The last ray out (B) hovers at the Schwarzschild radius and defines a horizon.

Image of Fig. 4.
Fig. 4.

Collapse of a thin light shell in Kruskal–Szekeres coordinates, to be compared with Fig. 1(b) in Eddington–Finkelstein coordinates. Only the spacetime region to the right of the line has physical meaning. Compare the light rays A B C to those in Fig. 3.

Image of Fig. 5.
Fig. 5.

The pure or eternal Schwarzschild geometry in Kruskal–Szekeres coordinates. The entire spacetime region shown is given physical meaning in terms of a white hole region and a second exterior Schwarzschild region. Compare to Fig. 4. See for example Refs. 3 and 4.

Image of Fig. 6.
Fig. 6.

Collapse of a uniform fluid sphere to form a black hole in Painleve–Gullstrand coordinates.

Image of Fig. 7.
Fig. 7.

A thin shell of dust falls into a black hole to form a larger black hole in Painleve–Gullstrand coordinates. This is the analog of Fig. 1 for light.

Image of Fig. 8.
Fig. 8.

(a) A discrete sequence of dust shells forms a black hole, (b) a continuous version of the same process forms a black hole. These are analogs of Fig. 2 for light.

Image of Fig. 9.
Fig. 9.

Some “outgoing” light rays in the collapsing dust ball. No ray can escape from the center after the last ray out (B). Compare to Fig. 3 for light shell collapse.

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/content/aapt/journal/ajp/73/12/10.1119/1.2117187
2005-12-01
2014-04-17
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Simple analytical models of gravitational collapse
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aapt/journal/ajp/73/12/10.1119/1.2117187
10.1119/1.2117187
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