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Conceptual development about motion and force in elementary and middle school students
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10.1119/1.3090824
/content/aapt/journal/ajp/77/5/10.1119/1.3090824
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aapt/journal/ajp/77/5/10.1119/1.3090824

Figures

Image of Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.

Pre- and post-diagnostic results for a class of 4th grade students. The white, gray, and black columns represent the percentage of students giving direction-only, snapshot, and dynamic descriptions of the motion, respectively. For each motion example there is a shift from the direction-only toward the dynamic description of the motion.

Image of Fig. 2.
Fig. 2.

Pre- and post-diagnostic results for a class of 6th grade students. The columns have the same meaning as in Fig. 1. For each motion example there is a shift from the direction-only toward the dynamic description of the motion.

Image of Fig. 3.
Fig. 3.

Pre- and post-diagnostic results for a class of 8th grade students. The columns have the same meaning as in Fig. 1. For each motion example there is a shift from the direction-only toward the dynamic description of the motion.

Image of Fig. 4.
Fig. 4.

Pre- and post-diagnostic results for a class of 6th grade students showing more pronounced change. The columns have the same meaning as in Fig. 1. For each motion example there is an even more pronounced shift from the direction-only toward the dynamic description of the motion than for the other 6th grade students in Fig. 2.

Image of Fig. 5.
Fig. 5.

Pre- and post-diagnostic results for a class of 8th grade students showing more pronounced change. The columns have the same meaning as in Fig. 1. For each motion example there is an even more pronounced shift from the direction-only toward the dynamic description of the motion than for the other 8th grade students in Fig. 3.

Image of Fig. 6.
Fig. 6.

(a) Predicted velocity-time graph sketched by 15 of 99 non-science college students for the motion described in Sec. VI B. (b) Predicted velocity-time graph sketched by 21 of 99 non-science college students for the motion described in Sec. VI B. (c) Predicted velocity-time graph sketched by 40 of 99 non-science college students for the motion described in Sec. VI B. (d) Predicted velocity-time graph sketched by 9 of 99 non-science college students for the motion described in Sec. VI B. (e) Predicted velocity-time graph sketched by 6 of 99 college students for the motion described in Sec. VI B.

Tables

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Table I.

Numbers of students in the study. Only those students present for both the pre- and the post-diagnostic (matched pairs) are included in any of the results presented in this report.

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Table II.

Distribution of the students on the post-diagnostic who gave snapshot view responses on the pre-diagnostic. is the number of students whose descriptions were categorized as snapshot on the pre-diagnostic for each type of motion.

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/content/aapt/journal/ajp/77/5/10.1119/1.3090824
2009-05-01
2014-04-18
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Conceptual development about motion and force in elementary and middle school students
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aapt/journal/ajp/77/5/10.1119/1.3090824
10.1119/1.3090824
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