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What happens between pre- and post-tests: Multiple measurements of student understanding during an introductory physics course
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10.1119/1.3384261
/content/aapt/journal/ajp/78/7/10.1119/1.3384261
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aapt/journal/ajp/78/7/10.1119/1.3384261
View: Figures

Figures

Image of Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.

Example of flat response curves for two questions in mechanics, with an average of 32 students per week. Error bars in all the figures represent 1 standard deviation of the mean.

Image of Fig. 2.
Fig. 2.

Example of a flat response curve for a DC circuit question; all batteries are identical. There are no changes during instruction. Average of 32 students per week.

Image of Fig. 3.
Fig. 3.

Example of a step-up response curve for an -field question. There is an increase during instruction and no subsequent change. Average of 32 students per week.

Image of Fig. 4.
Fig. 4.

Example of a step-up response curve for a DC circuit question. Average of 32 students per week.

Image of Fig. 5.
Fig. 5.

Example of a rise and decay response curve for an -field question. There is an increase during instruction and subsequent decrease in performance. Average of 32 students per week.

Image of Fig. 6.
Fig. 6.

Example of a rise and decay response affected by interference for an electric potential question. There is an increase in correct, scalarlike answers during electric potential instruction and a decrease during magnetic field instruction. The vectorlike answers increase during instruction of vector fields ( and ). The increase in correct answers in the last week corresponds to a review homework set (see Fig. 11). Average of 35 students per week. Errors of vectorlike answers are similar in size.

Image of Fig. 7.
Fig. 7.

Example of a response curve affected by interference for an electric field question. There is an increase in correct, vectorlike answers during and field (vector) instruction, and a decrease during electric potential instruction. The scalarlike answers tend to increase during instruction of the scalar electric potential. Average of 35 students per week. Errors of scalarlike answers are similar in size.

Image of Fig. 8.
Fig. 8.

Example of a response curve affected by interference for a magnetic force question. Just after -field instruction, most answers are in the direction of the -field, similar to what they were taught for -field and electric force. The correct answers rapidly increase during magnetic force instruction. It is not clear why the answers are somewhat random during -field instruction. The three main responses are shown. The “direction of ” response included both a and b. Average of 28 students per week. Errors of direction-of- answers are similar in size.

Image of Fig. 9.
Fig. 9.

Example of a response curve affected by interference for an electric force question. Before -field instruction, the majority of answers are correct, in the direction of the electric field . Answers in the direction perpendicular to the velocity and electric field increase rapidly during magnetic force instruction, demonstrating that students confuse electric force with magnetic force. The three main responses are shown. The “direction of ” response includes both a and b. Response errors of direction-of- answers are similar in size.

Image of Fig. 10.
Fig. 10.

Example of a high response curve for a DC circuit question, with a resolution on the order of 1 day. Note the rapid increase in score occurs 1 week after the relevant traditional lecture and laboratories, coinciding with the homework, which includes immediate feedback. Over 60% of student complete the homework with 2 days of due date. Average of 12 students per point. Days 13 and 14 were combined, as well as days 18 and 19 to reach the minimum of 6 students for each point. Note that the scale of the horizontal axis is not uniform. Error bars represent 1 standard error of the mean.

Image of Fig. 11.
Fig. 11.

Example of a high response curve for a collection of four electric potential questions, with a resolution on the order of 1 day. Note the rapid increase in score occurs 2 days after the relevant traditional lectures and laboratories (questions were answered after lectures on days 16 and 18), coinciding with the homework, which includes immediate feedback. Over 65% of student complete the homework with 2 days of due date. Note also the peak on day 48, when a relevant review homework was due. Average of 12 students per point, with a minimum 5 students per point. Note that the scale of the horizontal axis is not uniform. Error bars represent 1 standard deviation of the mean.

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/content/aapt/journal/ajp/78/7/10.1119/1.3384261
2010-06-11
2014-04-21
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: What happens between pre- and post-tests: Multiple measurements of student understanding during an introductory physics course
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aapt/journal/ajp/78/7/10.1119/1.3384261
10.1119/1.3384261
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