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Observation of phase transition in a simple mechanical system
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10.1119/1.4789549
/content/aapt/journal/ajp/81/3/10.1119/1.4789549
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aapt/journal/ajp/81/3/10.1119/1.4789549
View: Figures

Figures

Image of Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.

A simple schematic -symmetric physical system: A box located at x = −a contains a sink (an antenna that absorbs) and a box located at x = +a contains a source (an antenna that radiates at an equal rate). Under space reflection the boxes interchange, and under time reversal the sink becomes a source and the source becomes a sink. Thus, the system is symmetric.

Image of Fig. 2.
Fig. 2.

Oscillatory motion of a pair of coupled pendula with no loss or gain [system (11) with coupling parameter ]. The x-displacement is shown in the top panel and the y-displacement is shown in the bottom panel. Rabi power oscillations occur in which the maximum and minimum displacements x(t) and y(t) are out of phase.

Image of Fig. 3.
Fig. 3.

Numerical solution to the overly simple coupled-oscillator system (12) for the parameter choice , which is deep in the broken- -symmetric region. As expected, the y-oscillator exhibits gain but, after an initial period of decay, the x-oscillator also exhibits gain. This behavior is a result of the system not conserving energy, and the excess energy in the y-oscillator leaks into the x-oscillator.

Image of Fig. 4.
Fig. 4.

Numerical simulation of the improved energy-conserving oscillator model in the unbroken- region. In these graphs and g = 0.01. That is, 1% of the energy in the x-oscillator is removed at each peak and this exact amount of energy is then transferred to the y-oscillator when it reaches a peak. This transfer reduces the peak x-amplitude to 99.5% of its former value, which is too small to be seen on this graph. We can see that the symmetry is not broken—the Rabi oscillations persist and the amplitudes of these oscillations remain constant.

Image of Fig. 5.
Fig. 5.

Numerical simulation of the improved energy-conserving oscillator model in the broken- region. Here, the coupling is reduced to and the energy transfer is increased to g = 0.3. For this value of g, 30% of the energy in the x-oscillator is removed each time x reaches a peak and this exact amount of energy is then transferred to the y-oscillator when it reaches a peak. This transfer reduces the peak amplitude to 0.837 of previous value, and this change can be seen in the plot of x(t). Observe that the Rabi oscillations cease and that the x-oscillations die down to a limiting amplitude and correspondingly the y-oscillations increase to a limiting amplitude. This is the characteristic behavior of an oscillator system having a broken symmetry.

Image of Fig. 6.
Fig. 6.

A photograph of the two-pendulum experiment. Two pendula are suspended from a horizontal rope and the tension in the rope is adjusted to increase or decrease the coupling of the pendula. The horizontal rope runs around a wheel to the left (not shown) and is attached to a tray upon which weights can be added or subtracted to change the tension. Electromagnets near the top of the strings supporting the bobs apply brief impulses to small iron nails attached by white tape to the strings. The electromagnets are triggered by pairs of optical sensors just above the pendulum bobs. The electromagnets are timed so that on each swing a small amount of kinetic energy is subtracted from the left pendulum and a roughly equal amount of kinetic energy is added to the right pendulum.

Image of Fig. 7.
Fig. 7.

Experimentally measured motion of the pendula with the magnets turned off. The tension in the string is maintained by a 200-g mass. To produce these graphs, we use a camera that records the instantaneous position of each pendulum (plus marks on the graph) 15 times per second. We then fit a curve through these data points. The motion of the pendula is qualitatively similar to that in the theoretical curves shown in Fig. 2 . In this configuration, the symmetry is unbroken, which is signaled by the presence of Rabi power oscillations that are out of phase. One can observe a slight decay in the amplitudes of the pendula due to friction.

Image of Fig. 8.
Fig. 8.

Experimental data showing the motion of the pendula when the magnets are turned on weakly and the coupling of the pendula is decreased (the tension in the supporting rope is maintained using a mass of 400 g). Observe that the Rabi power oscillations in Fig. 7 persist, meaning that the system remains in a region of unbroken symmetry.

Image of Fig. 9.
Fig. 9.

Experimental data showing the motion of the pendula when the magnets are turned on more strongly and the coupling of the pendula is weak (the tension in the supporting string is maintained by a mass of 600 g). Observe that the Rabi oscillations have ceased; this is the signal that the system is in a region of broken symmetry.

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/content/aapt/journal/ajp/81/3/10.1119/1.4789549
2013-02-19
2014-04-20
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Observation of PT phase transition in a simple mechanical system
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aapt/journal/ajp/81/3/10.1119/1.4789549
10.1119/1.4789549
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