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Student understanding of the application of Newton's second law to rotating rigid bodies
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10.1119/1.4797457
/content/aapt/journal/ajp/81/6/10.1119/1.4797457
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aapt/journal/ajp/81/6/10.1119/1.4797457

Figures

Image of Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.

(a) Figure shown to students on a written problem. Students were asked to compare the center-of-mass accelerations of the three blocks at the instant shown. (b) Figure shown to students on the “circular-pucks” problem. Students were asked to compare the center-of-mass accelerations of the three pucks at the instant shown.

Image of Fig. 2.
Fig. 2.

Perspective-view (left) and top-view (right) diagrams shown to students in the “block-and-spool” problem. Students were asked which object crosses the finish line first and whether the spool rotates.

Image of Fig. 3.
Fig. 3.

Figure shown to students in the “incline” problem. Objects A–C are released from the same height. Objects A and B roll without slipping and object C slides down the incline. Objects B and C are at the same height as each other when object A reaches the bottom. Students were asked to rank the frictional forces on the three objects.

Image of Fig. 4.
Fig. 4.

The “magic-ruler” experiment from the early versions of the tutorial .

Image of Fig. 5.
Fig. 5.

Figure shown to students in the “unconnected-spools” problem and in the early versions of the tutorial. The spools are described as having the same mass and being released from rest from the same height above the floor. Students were asked whether the center-of-mass acceleration of spool A would be greater than, less than, or equal to that of spool B, and to predict which spool would hit the floor first.

Image of Fig. 6.
Fig. 6.

Figure shown to students in the “connected-spools” problem and in the current version of the tutorial. The spools are described as having the same mass and being released from rest from the same height above the floor. Students were asked whether the center-of-mass acceleration of spool A would be greater than, less than, or equal to that of spool B, and to predict which spool would hit the floor first.

Image of Fig. 7.
Fig. 7.

Diagram for a problem in the homework for the current version of , as printed in the homework (top), and correctly completed in gray (bottom).

Tables

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Table I.

Student performance on part of the “” problem in which students were asked to compare the center-of-mass accelerations of two of the pucks [see Fig. 1(b) ] and the “” problem in which students were asked which object crosses the finish line first (see Fig. 2 ). Two versions of the “block-and-spool” problem were given. In one version (“video”) students were shown a short video of a spool being pulled across an air table by a string that unwinds as it pulls, prior to being asked to compare the motions of the block-and-spool. Results were obtained on the topic and after varying degrees of exposure to the topic of rigid body dynamics in lecture, textbook and lab. Percentages are with respect to the total number of students who responded. Responses were categorized without regard to the explanation given.

Generic image for table
Table II.

Student performance on the problem, in which students are asked to rank the magnitudes of the frictional forces on the three objects (see Fig. 3 ). Results were obtained on the topic and after varying degrees of exposure to the topic of rigid body dynamics in lecture, textbook and lab. Percentages are with respect to the total number of students who responded. Responses were categorized without regard to the explanation given.

Generic image for table
Table III.

Student performance on the problem and the problem (see Figs. 5 and 6 ). In both cases students were asked to compare the center-of-mass accelerations of the two spools and to predict which spool will strike the ground first. Results were obtained on the topic and after varying degrees of exposure to the topic of rigid body dynamics in lecture, textbook and lab. Percentages are with respect to the total number of students who responded. Responses were categorized without regard to the explanation given.

Generic image for table
Table IV.

Student performance on various problems without (or before) tutorial instruction on the topic of rigid body dynamics, or with the current version of Uncertainties (representing a 95% confidence interval) are quoted in those cases in which the number of sections is sufficient to establish that the distribution is normal. The third column shows obtained using a permutation test. Statistically significant -values are in bold-face.

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/content/aapt/journal/ajp/81/6/10.1119/1.4797457
2013-05-20
2014-04-21
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Student understanding of the application of Newton's second law to rotating rigid bodies
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aapt/journal/ajp/81/6/10.1119/1.4797457
10.1119/1.4797457
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