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A Stand-Alone Interactive Physics Showcase
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1.phet.colorado.edu; see also Katherine Perkins, Wendy Adams, Michael Dubson, Noah Finkelstein, Sam Reid, Carl Wieman, and Ron LeMaster, “PhET: Interactive simulations for teaching and learning physics,” Phys. Teach. 44, 1823 (Jan. 2006).
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/content/aapt/journal/tpt/50/4/10.1119/1.3694079
2012-03-19
2015-07-05

Abstract

We present a showcase with interactive exhibits of basic physical experiments that constitutes a complementary method for teaching physics and interesting students in physical phenomena. Our interactive physics showcase, shown in Fig. 1, stimulates interest for science by letting the students experience, firsthand, surprising phenomena and teaching physical concepts. By letting the students interact with the experiments under optimum safety conditions and with good protection against vandalism, our approach complements interactive simulations, e.g., as offered by the Physics Education Technology project.1

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Scitation: A Stand-Alone Interactive Physics Showcase
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aapt/journal/tpt/50/4/10.1119/1.3694079
10.1119/1.3694079
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