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/content/aapt/journal/tpt/50/8/10.1119/1.4758140
1.
1.Thomas B. Greenslade, “Fourteen things you can do with a stick,” Phys. Teach. 39, 106107 (Feb. 2001).
http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.1355170
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aapt/journal/tpt/50/8/10.1119/1.4758140
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/content/aapt/journal/tpt/50/8/10.1119/1.4758140
2012-10-09
2016-08-26

Abstract

Teaching physics concepts with the basic materials that are around us is one of the beauties of physics. Without expensive lab materials and long experiments, many physics concepts can be taught to students using simple tools. Demonstrations with these tools can be presented as discrepant events that surprise, amaze, or puzzle students. Greenslade1 has excellently described 14 things we can do with a stick, one of which is the “stick on two fingers.” In this paper I describe some variations of the “stick on two fingers” demonstration.

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