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Bringing the Digital Camera to the Physics Lab
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1.
1. J. D. E. Beynon and D. R. Lamb, Charge-Coupled Devices and Their Applications (McGraw-Hill, London, 1980); en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charge-coupled_device (and references therein); and
1.Albert J. P. Theuwissen, Solid-State Imaging With Charge-Coupled Devices (Springer, New York, 1995).
2.
2.David B. Goldstein, “Physical Limits in Digital Photography” (Northlight Images, 2009). Free pdf at www.northlight-images.co.uk/downloadable_2/Phys ical_Limits_2.pdf.
3.
3.C. D. Mackay, “Charge-coupled devices in astronomy,” Ann. Rev. Astron. Astrophys. 24, 255283 (1986).
4.
4.All the pictures in this work were taken with a reflex digital camera Nikon D80 with intensity calibration at the native value (ISO 100) to avoid electrical amplification after the sensing unit. The lens used is a Nikkor 200 mm set at fixed f/16 diaphragm value. The focus was adjusted in manual mode.
5.
5.M. F. Santillo, “A simple illustrative model of a charge-coupled device (CCD),” Phys. Teach. 47,454455 (Oct. 2009).
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Image of Fig. 1.

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Fig. 1.

A “black hole” cut in a sheet of white paper (upper part) and its intensity profile (lower part) averaged through the red rectangle (size about 1000 × 50 pixels, 12 bit). Exposure values: 1 s, f/16.

Image of Fig. 2.

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Fig. 2.

Digital light signal as a function of exposure time for a white sheet of paper (see text). JPEG, 8-bit, compressed format. All shots taken at f/16.

Image of Fig. 3.

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Fig. 3.

Digital light signal as a function of exposure time for a white sheet of paper (see text). RAW, 12-bit, uncompressed format. All shots taken at f/16.

Image of Fig. 4.

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Fig. 4.

Single-slit diffraction image.

Image of Fig. 5.

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Fig. 5.

Comparison between computed intensity diffraction curve [Eq. (1) , blue line] and observed JPEG image (green line, taken from photo of Fig. 4 , 8-bit version).

Image of Fig. 6.

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Fig. 6.

Comparison between computed intensity diffraction curve [Eq. (1) , blue line] and observed RAW image (red line, taken from photo of Fig. 4 , 12-bit version).

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/content/aapt/journal/tpt/51/3/10.1119/1.4792005
2013-02-08
2014-04-17

Abstract

We discuss how compressed images created by modern digital cameras can lead to even severe problems in the quantitative analysis of experiments based on such images. Difficulties result from the nonlinear treatment of lighting intensity values stored in compressed files. To overcome such troubles, one has to adopt noncompressed, native formats, as we examine in this work.

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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Bringing the Digital Camera to the Physics Lab
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aapt/journal/tpt/51/3/10.1119/1.4792005
10.1119/1.4792005
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