1887
banner image
No data available.
Please log in to see this content.
You have no subscription access to this content.
No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
f
Experiential Education on the Edge: SETI Activities for the College Classroom
Rent:
Rent this article for
Access full text Article
/content/aas/journal/aer/11/1/10.3847/AER2012033
1.
1. Cain, G. 1975, “ Extra-Terrestrial Life: An Introduction to Physical Science,” The Physics Teacher, 13, 404.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.2339199
2.
2. Cocconi, G. and Morrison, D. 1959, “ Searching for Interstellar Communication,” Nature, 184, 844.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/184844a0
3.
3. Cranton, P. 2002, “ Teaching for Transformation,” New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, 2002, 63.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ace.50
4.
4. Crider, A. 2011, “ Debating Pluto: Searching for the Classroom of the Future and Ending Up in the Past,” Astronomy Beat, 74, 1.
5.
5. Davis, J. R. 1995, Interdisciplinary Courses and Team Teaching: New Arrangements for Learning, Phoenix: The Oryx Press.
6.
6. Davies, P. 2010. The Eerie Silence: Renewing Our Search for Alien Intelligence, New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.
7.
7. Drake, F. and Sobel, D. 2010, “ The Origin of the Drake Equation,” Astronomy Beat, 46, 1.
8.
8. Francis, P. 2005, “ Using Role-Playing Games to Teach Astronomy: An Evaluation,” Astronomy Education Review, 4, 1.
http://dx.doi.org/10.3847/AER2005016
9.
9. Hobson, A. 2001, “ Enlivening Introductory Physics With SETI,” The Physics Teacher, 39, 436.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.1416319
10.
10. Letterman, M. R. and Dugan, K. B. 2004, “ Team Teaching a Cross-Disciplinary Honors Course: Preparation and Development,” College Teaching, 52, 76.
11.
11. Rhodes, T. ed. 2010, Assessing Outcomes and Improving Achievement: Tips and Tools for Using Rubrics. Washington, DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities.
12.
12. Sagan, C. 1985, Contact, New York: Pocket Books.
13.
13. Sagan, C. and Shklovskii, I. S. 1984, Intelligent Life in the Universe. San Francisco: Holden Day.
14.
14. Slater, T. F. 1999, “ Including Students in the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence,” The Physics Teacher, 37, 264.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.880269
15.
15. Straits, W. J. and Wilker, R. 2003, “ Activities-based Astronomy: An Evaluation of an Instructor's First Attempt and its Impact on Student Characteristics,” Astronomy Education Review, 2, 46.
http://dx.doi.org/10.3847/AER2003003
16.
16. Stroessner, S. J. , Beckerman, L. S. , and Whittaker, A. 2009, “ All the world's a stage? Consequences of a role-playing pedagogy on psychological factors and writing and rhetorical skill in college undergraduates,” Journal of Educational Psychology, 101, 605.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0015055
17.
17. Thompson, R. 2003, “ How Big Science Gets Funded—An Introduction for Students to the Politics of Space Science Funding,” Astronomy Education Review, 2, 144.
http://dx.doi.org/10.3847/AER2003009
18.
18. Webb, S. 2002, If the Universe Is Teeming with Aliens… Where Is Everybody? Fifty Solutions to Fermi's Paradox and the Problem of Extraterrestrial Life, New York: Springer.
19.
19. Weston, A. 1988, “ Radio Astronomy as Epistemology: Some Philosophical Reflections on the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence,” The Monist, 71, 88.
20.
20. Weston, A. 2003, “ What if Teaching Went Wild?” in Philosophy of Education 2002, ed. Scott Fletcher, Urbana, Illinois: Philosophy of Education Society, 40.
21.
21. Weston, A. 2012, “ To the Stars,” in Mobilizing the Green Imagination: An Exuberant Manifesto, Gabriola Island, BC: New Society Publishers.
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aas/journal/aer/11/1/10.3847/AER2012033
Loading

Figures

Image of Figure 1.

Click to view

Figure 1.

Students role-playing a first contact experience between humans and aliens. These “KICK Astronauts” are in their command module remotely observing the progress of the Shuttle One team via a FaceTime video call as the team lands on the planet Aurora.

Image of Figure 2.

Click to view

Figure 2.

Students role-playing a first contact experience between humans and aliens. These “Aurorans” (in the foreground) are gathered around a sacred fire in their tree dwelling as the human approaches (in the background).

Image of Figure 3.

Click to view

Figure 3.

Students role-playing a first contact experience with aliens. These “KICK Astronauts” are conducting experiments on a captured “Auroran.”

Image of Figure 4.

Click to view

Figure 4.

The Final Exam, Part One: Cue “Thus Spake Zarathustra”. Students entered the classroom to find it completely empty except for an 8-feet tall black monolith akin to the one in the film 2001: A Space Odyssey. Four cameras and microphones in each corner of the room recorded their responses.

Image of Figure 5.

Click to view

Figure 5.

During the third 30 min, students used the monolith as a conference table and discussed how the monolith related to the class themes.

Image of Figure 6.

Click to view

Figure 6.

The second part of the final exam, later dubbed “Part Two: Animal Planet,” took place in the backyard of Crider's home. The students entered and found three hens, a pitcher of water, a bowl of sesame seeds, assorted glassware, five cheese pizzas, and one barbeque chicken pizza.

Tables

Generic image for table

Click to view

Generic image for table

Click to view

Generic image for table

Click to view

Abstract

In a sophomore-level, interdisciplinary honors class, we introduced students to the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence through assigned readings, student presentations, classroom discussions, and multiple experiential activities. In this paper, we present four of these novel experiential activities. In the first, students suddenly find themselves trying to make contact with an unknown person who is simultaneously trying to contact them. The second is a course-long role-playing exercise patterned after a “first contact” simulation held annually at the CONTACT: Culture of the Imagination conferences. The third and fourth are parts of a unique final exam where students must respond as a group to two surreal encounters, one being a “2001”-style monolith that shows up, as in the film, entirely without warning or instructions. For the final, we also developed an assessment rubric appropriate for this kind of open-ended test. We conclude by discussing recommendations for implementing similar experiential education activities, both specifically and in spirit, in other classes.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/aas/journal/aer/11/1/1.4752476.html;jsessionid=ad4csgl97k014.x-aip-live-06?itemId=/content/aas/journal/aer/11/1/10.3847/AER2012033&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah&containerItemId=content/aas/journal/aer
true
true
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Experiential Education on the Edge: SETI Activities for the College Classroom
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aas/journal/aer/11/1/10.3847/AER2012033
10.3847/AER2012033
SEARCH_EXPAND_ITEM