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Astronomy Podcasting: A Low-Cost Tool for Affecting Attitudes in Diverse Audiences
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3847/AER2006004
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http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aas/journal/aer/5/1/10.3847/AER2006003
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Figures

Image of Figure 1.

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Figure 1.

Comparison of Number of Shows Listened to in LS1 and LS2. For LS1, the average is 12, mode is 1, median is 8, and max is 99 podcasts. For LS2, the average is 13, mode is 10, median is 10, and max is 90 podcasts.

Image of Figure 2.

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Figure 2.

Distribution of Listener Ages. This figure shows a histogram of the percentage of respondents having a given age averaged between LS1 and LS2 (red). The populations in these two surveys are statistically drawn from the same population (paired two-tailed t-test P value of , Pearson ). For comparison, the distribution of the U.S. population between 10 and 69 years is shown in blue (U.S. Census 1990).

Image of Figure 3.

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Figure 3.

Distribution of Listener Incomes. Shown is a histogram of salary versus percentage of listeners, breaking out ages 21 and under versus ages 22 and over.

Image of Figure 4.

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Figure 4.

Distribution of Listener Education Level. Note that the option “No high school degree∕Not a student” was introduced in LS2. The graph shows stacked histogram of listener education level by percentage.

Tables

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Table 1.

Top 10 Sciences Shows Listed in the iTunes Music Store on January 5, 2006

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Table 2.

Method for Downloading Podcasts Responses

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Table 3.

Standard Podcast Keywords and Their Most Common Uses

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Table 4.

Source of Financial Support for Podcasting-Related Costs for Respondents Of PS1 and PS2. Respondents were allowed to fractionally select more than one source

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Table 5.

Change in Attitude toward Astronomy before and after Listening to Astronomy-Including Podcasts

Abstract

Communications and mainstream media are entering a new age of on-demand content. As digital video recorders, like TiVo, change how we watch television, podcasts are taking the spoken word in its own on-demand direction. Astronomy podcasts allow listeners to get up-to-date content on a variety of topics ranging from what’s in the sky to what’s in the news. In August 2005 and January 2006, we conducted surveys of astronomy podcast listeners and producers. Using the results of these studies, we examine how to create a podcast, who is listening, and how astronomy podcasting is affecting its listeners’ attitudes toward astronomy. The article cites the Slacker Astronomy podcast as an example astronomy podcast throughout.

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Scitation: Astronomy Podcasting: A Low-Cost Tool for Affecting Attitudes in Diverse Audiences
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aas/journal/aer/5/1/10.3847/AER2006003
10.3847/AER2006003
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