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Impact of Modifying Activity-Based Instructional Materials for Special Needs Students in Middle School Astronomy
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24.See EPAPS supplementary material at http://dx.doi.org/10.3847/AER2008019 for the additional appendix content in PDF format.[Supplementary Material]
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aas/journal/aer/7/2/10.3847/AER2008019
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Figures

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Figure 1.

The Intersection of Three Fields of Study

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Figure 2.

Comparison of weather data

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Figure 3.

Comparison of satellite data

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Figure 4.

Comparison of daylight hours

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Figure 5.

Temperature comparison

Tables

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Table 1.

Problems and Solutions

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Table 2.

Comparison of Overall Gains from Nationwide Aggregate, Unmodified, and Modified Groups

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Table 3.

Unmodified Curriculum Group: Special Education Students’s Responses to the Selected Question

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Table 4.

Modified Curriculum Group: Special Education Students’ Responses to the Selected Question

Abstract

Middle school students who have special needs because they are learning disabled require targeted attention in our nation’s pursuit of improved science achievement for all students. In early 2006, the Lawrence Hall of Science conducted a national field test of a newly developed GEMS (Great Explorations in Math and Science) space science curriculum package for middle school students. During this field testing, we modified a subset of the curriculum materials to reflect the principles of best practices in working with special needs students, specifically learning disabled students, in a subset of the field test classrooms to determine if these students scored differently on the assessments than students in the larger assessment database. Results suggest that many students, not just those with special needs, demonstrate achievement gains using instructional materials purposefully aligned with research-informed principles of best practices for special needs students.

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Scitation: Impact of Modifying Activity-Based Instructional Materials for Special Needs Students in Middle School Astronomy
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aas/journal/aer/7/2/10.3847/AER2008019
10.3847/AER2008019
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