1887
banner image
No data available.
Please log in to see this content.
You have no subscription access to this content.
No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
f
Advanced Undergraduate and Early Graduate Physics Students’ Misconception About Solar Wind Flow: Evidence of Students’ Difficulties in Distinguishing Paradigms
Rent:
Rent this article for
Access full text Article
/content/aas/journal/aer/8/1/10.3847/AER2009013
1.
1.Baumjohann, W. , and Treumann, R. , 1997. Basic Space Plasma Physics, London: Imperial College Press.
2.
2.Ding, L. , Chabay, R. , Sherwood, B. , and Beichner, R. , 2006. “Evaluating an electricity and magnetism assessment tool: Brief electricity and magnetism assessment,” Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res., 2, 1, DOI:10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.2.010105.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevSTPER.2.010105
3.
3.Hake, R. R. , 1998. “Interactive engagement versus traditional methods: A six-thousand-student survey of mechanics test data for introductory physics courses,” Am. J. Phys., 66, 64.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.18809
4.
4.Hestenes, D. , Wells, M. , and Swackhamer, G. , 1992. “Force Concept Inventory,” Phys. Teach., 30, 141.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.2343497
5.
5.Hughes, W. J. , and Hudson, M. K. , 2004. “Towards an integrated model of the space weather system,” J. Atmos. Sol.-Terr. Phys., 66, 1241, DOI:10.1016/j.jastp.2004.06.001.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jastp.2004.06.001
6.
6.Kivelson, M. G. , and Russell, C. T. , eds., 1995. Introduction to Space Physics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
7.
7.Lopez, R. E. , 2008. “Space Physics and Teaching Undergradute Electromagnetism,” Adv. Space Res., 42, 1859, DOI:10.1016/j.asr.2007.11.010.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.asr.2007.11.010
8.
8.Lopez, R. E. , and Gross, N. A. , 2008. “Active Learning for Advanced Students: The Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling Graduate Summer School,” Adv. Space Res., 42, 1864, DOI:10.1016/j.asr.2007.06.056.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.asr.2007.06.056
9.
9.McDermott, L. C. , 2001. “Oersted Medal Lecture 2001: Physics Education Research—The Key to Student Learning,” Am. J. Phys., 69, 1127, DOI:10.1119/1.1389280.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.1389280
10.
10.Morrow, C. A. , Harold, J. , and Dusenbery, P. , 2005. “Science Communication Efforts in Space Weather: Benefits and Challenges of the ‘Weather’ Analogy,” 2nd AMS Space Weather Symposium in 2005 (San Diego).
11.
11.NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center 2002. “The Solar Wind’s Average Spiral Field,” http://lepmfi.gsfc.nasa.gov/mfi/lepedu/SpiralField.html.
12.
12.Odstrcil, D. , 2003. “Modeling 3-D solar wind structure,” Adv. Space Res., 32, 497.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0273-1177(03)00332-6
13.
13.Simpson, S. , 2004. “Sun-to-Mud Education in Two Weeks,” Space Weather, 2, S07002, DOI:10.1029/2004SW000092.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2004SW000092
14.
14.Tascione, T. , 1994. Introduction to the Space Environment, 2nd ed., Malabar, FL: Krieger Pub. Co.
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aas/journal/aer/8/1/10.3847/AER2009013
Loading

Figures

Image of Figure 1.

Click to view

Figure 1.

Full credit response to solar wind question on graduate level final exam

Image of Figure 2.

Click to view

Figure 2.

Zero credit response to solar wind question on graduate level final exam

Image of Figure 3.

Click to view

Figure 3.

Picture of students simulating the solar wind with embedded magnetic field represented by ropes that students are holding. The ropes have been highlighted in the picture to make them move visible

Tables

Generic image for table

Click to view

Table 1.

Pre- and posttest results for solar wind question

Generic image for table

Click to view

Table 2.

Changes in student responses before pre- and postcourse

Abstract

Anecdotal evidence has suggested that advanced undergraduate students confuse the spiral structure of the interplanetary magnetic field with the flow of the solar wind. Though it is a small study, this paper documents this misconception and begins to investigate the underlying issues behind it. We present evidence that the traditional presentation of this concept can lead to this misconception and that it persists into graduate school. Two consistent models of plasmas that apply under different circumstances are presented during the course. Evidence suggests that students attempt to apply the models to inappropriate circumstances, which leads to a misconception. There is also evidence that a fundamental mechanics misconception contributes to students’ difficulties. Finally, we argue that many of the broad conclusions of the research done at the introductory undergraduate level are applicable to upper division and graduate students. In particular, we conclude that direct instruction at this level through lecture-demonstration can leave students with misconceptions and even unintentionally reinforce those misconceptions.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/aas/journal/aer/8/1/1.3090170.html;jsessionid=41qek6gnb78fu.x-aip-live-06?itemId=/content/aas/journal/aer/8/1/10.3847/AER2009013&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah&containerItemId=content/aas/journal/aer
true
true
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Advanced Undergraduate and Early Graduate Physics Students’ Misconception About Solar Wind Flow: Evidence of Students’ Difficulties in Distinguishing Paradigms
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aas/journal/aer/8/1/10.3847/AER2009013
10.3847/AER2009013
SEARCH_EXPAND_ITEM