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College Students’ Preinstructional Ideas About Stars and Star Formation
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http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aas/journal/aer/8/1/10.3847/AER2009038
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Tables

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Table 1.

SSR Survey Questions

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Table 2.

Themes Identified in Student Responses to “What is a star?” (Note: Because responses could be coded for more than one theme, percentages may add to more than 100%; rows that are indented and in italics represent subthemes)

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Table 3.

Classification of Student Responses to “What is a star?”

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Table 4.

Themes Identified in Student Responses to “How is the light that we see from stars created?” (Note: Because responses could be coded for more than one theme, percentages may add to more than 100%; rows that are indented and in italics represent subthemes)

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Table 5.

Classification of Student Responses to “How is the light that we see from stars created?”

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Table 6.

Themes Identified in Student Responses to “How is a star formed?” (Note: Because responses could be coded for more than one theme, percentages may add to more than 100%; rows that are indented and in italics represent subthemes)

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Table 7.

Classification of Student Responses to “How is a star formed?”

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Table 8.

Responses to “Are all stars the same?”

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Table 9.

Themes Identified in Student Responses to “In what way(s) are all stars the same?” (Note: Because responses could be coded for more than one theme, percentages may add to more than 100%)

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Table 10.

Themes Identified in Student Responses to “In what way(s) are stars different?” (Note: Because responses could be coded for more than one theme, percentages may add to more than 100%)

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Table 11.

Responses to “Is there a difference between a star and a planet?”

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Table 12.

Themes Identified in Student Responses to “Describe what you think the differences [between stars and planets] are.” (Note: Because responses could be coded for more than one theme, percentages may add to more than 100%. Rows that are indented and in italics represent subthemes to the larger themes)

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Table 13.

Themes Identified in Student Responses to “Describe why you think [stars and planets] are the same.” (Note: Because responses could be coded for more than one theme, percentages may add to more than 100%)

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Table 14.

Themes Identified in Student Responses to “How is a shooting star different from a star?” (Note: Because responses could be coded for more than one theme, percentages may add to more than 100%; rows that are indented and in italics represent subthemes to the larger themes) (SS denotes shooting stars)

Abstract

This study (Note 1) investigated the beliefs about stars that students hold when they enter an undergraduate introductory astronomy course for nonscience majors. Students’ preinstructional ideas were investigated through the use of several student-supplied-response (SSR) surveys, which asked students to describe their ideas about topics such as what is a star, how is starlight created, how are stars formed, are all stars the same, and more. The results from more than 2,200 responses suggest that although students often have some initial knowledge about stars, their knowledge is often incomplete or incorrect in important ways that could negatively impact instructional objectives.

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Scitation: College Students’ Preinstructional Ideas About Stars and Star Formation
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aas/journal/aer/8/1/10.3847/AER2009038
10.3847/AER2009038
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