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Detection of pulsed far-infrared and terahertz light with an atomic force microscope
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10.1063/1.4757606
/content/aip/journal/apl/101/14/10.1063/1.4757606
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/apl/101/14/10.1063/1.4757606
View: Figures

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Principle of pulsed infrared light AFM detection.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Oscilloscope trace of the cantilever oscillation triggered with an FEL wavelength of 20 μm with (right) and without (left) a graphite layer (the 2 cantilevers have different resonnant frequencies).

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Comparison between the power meter and cantilever signals. Between 43 and 50 μm the power meter sensitive drops below its threshold level. This effect is due to a particular effect occurring in FELs using partial waveguiding (see Ref. 4).

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Beam profile at 37 μm using the cantilever. RMS size is approximately 2 mm, for the focusing used here (f = 1 m)

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Spectrum of the FEL at different wavelength. Holes at 62, 62.5, 63, and 63.5 μm on the spectra come from air absorption despite partial water purging.

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/content/aip/journal/apl/101/14/10.1063/1.4757606
2012-10-04
2014-04-19
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Detection of pulsed far-infrared and terahertz light with an atomic force microscope
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/apl/101/14/10.1063/1.4757606
10.1063/1.4757606
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