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Spatial and temporal frequency domain laser-ultrasound applied in the direct measurement of dispersion relations of surface acoustic waves
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15. The pixel pitch of the SLM is 8 μm, with 512 × 512 pixels dimensions of the tiled hologram. The focal length of the objective lens was 16 mm and the used excitation light wavelength 1550 nm.
16.
16. Material properties for molybdenum (Mo) and silicon oxide (SiO) all assumed to be isotropic; density ρ and elastic constants E and G are as follows: for Mo , 23.3 GPa and 90.25 GPa; for SiO , 71.3 GPa and 30.63 GPa. The best fit for the thickness of the Mo layer was obtained as 3.5 μm.
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/apl/102/1/10.1063/1.4773234
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Figures

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FIG. 1.

Working principle of STeMoLUS: (a) Spatially modulated laser beams are realized using a SLM leading to excitation of interfering SAWs. The interference is constructive if the SAW's wavelength is equal to the periodicity . For reasons of clarity, the reverse propagating wave is omitted in the figure. (b) Excitation pattern and detection spot on the sample surface (c) Simulated interference amplitudes for excitation frequencies in the range of three interference maxima and different numbers of excitation lines.

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FIG. 2.

Schematic of the STeMoLUS setup with the component labels given as Col.: collimator, M1–3: mirrors, DCM: dichroic mirror, PBS1,2: polarizing beam splitter, and : wave retarder plates, SRR: stabilized retroreflector.

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FIG. 3.

(a)–(d) Comparison of experimentally (top) and theoretically (bottom) obtained interference plots: (a) and (b) non-dispersive SAWs in aluminum, (c) and (d) dispersive SAWs in molybdenum coated glass. The first interference maxima correspond to the dispersion relations. As the interference condition is fulfilled for arbitrary integers m, several interference maxima arise. (e) Experimentally obtained SAW velocities compared to a theoretical dispersion curve for the system in (c) and (d). (f) Experimental verification of constructive interference on the aluminum sample: the amplitude of the observed interference for remains constant using 2, 3, or 4 excitation lines whilst keeping the total energy on the sample constant. The magnitudes are normalized by the single line frequency response to remove the damping effects.

Tables

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Table I.

Number of excitation lines in the measurements.

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/content/aip/journal/apl/102/1/10.1063/1.4773234
2013-01-03
2014-04-20

Abstract

We present a laser-ultrasound measurement technique which combines adjustable spatial and temporal modulation of the excitation laser beam. Our method spreads the intensity of an amplitude modulated continuous wave laser over a micro-scale pattern on the sample surface to excite surface acoustic waves. The excitation pattern consists of parallel, equidistant lines and the waves generated from the individual lines interfere on the sample surface. Measurement is done in the spatial-temporal frequency domain allowing the direct determination of dispersion relations. The technique performs with high signal-to-noise-ratios and low peak power densities on the sample.

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Scitation: Spatial and temporal frequency domain laser-ultrasound applied in the direct measurement of dispersion relations of surface acoustic waves
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/apl/102/1/10.1063/1.4773234
10.1063/1.4773234
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