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Improving imaging resolution of shaking targets by Fourier-transform ghost diffraction
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10.1063/1.4788727
/content/aip/journal/apl/102/2/10.1063/1.4788727
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/apl/102/2/10.1063/1.4788727
View: Figures

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Schematic of lensless FGD for shaking targets in one transverse dimension with pseudo-thermal light. The object is operated by a motion platform so that it can shake on the object plane, perpendicular to the optical axis.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Numerical simulation results of shaking object FGD with the lensless scheme shown in Fig. 1 (averaged 4000 measurements). X-axis indicates the position on the reference detector Dr . Y-axis indicates FGD reconstructed by measuring the intensity correlation function . (a)–(d) The shaking mode obeys to uniform statistical distribution, and the maximum shaking deviation from the optical axis is , respectively. (e)–(h) The shaking mode obeys to normal statistical distribution, and the maximum shaking deviation from the optical axis is, respectively, . Red dashed curves present FGD reconstructed in different shaking conditions versus black solid curves for the static condition.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Experimental results of shaking object FGD, the conditions are the same as Fig. 2 . The images in different shaking conditions reconstructed by measuring the intensity correlation function are listed at the upper left corners and red dashed curves are their cross-sections. In contrast, black solid curves are the cross-section of FGD obtained in the case of static condition.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

The object's imaging obtained using a conventional imaging system in different shaking conditions and retrieved from FGD patterns based on the experimental results of Fig. 3 . (a) The original object used in numerical simulation and experiments; (b) the object's imaging obtained using a conventional imaging system in the static case; (b1) phase-retrieval image of static object FGD; (c)–(f) and (c1)–(f1) are conventional imaging results and phase-retrieval results of FGD in the shaking conditions of Figs. 3(a)–3(d) , respectively; similarly, (g)–(j) and (g1)–(j1) are conventional imaging results and phase-retrieval results of FGD in the shaking conditions of Figs. 3(e)–3(h) , respectively.

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/content/aip/journal/apl/102/2/10.1063/1.4788727
2013-01-18
2014-04-16
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Improving imaging resolution of shaking targets by Fourier-transform ghost diffraction
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/apl/102/2/10.1063/1.4788727
10.1063/1.4788727
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