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Direct current electrical characterization of ds-DNA in nanogap junctions
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10.1063/1.1900315
    + View Affiliations - Hide Affiliations
    Affiliations:
    1 Birck Nanotechnology Center and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 USA
    2 Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 USA
    3 School of Physical Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 India
    4 Birck Nanotechnology Center and Bindley Bioscience Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 USA
    a) Present address: Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907.
    b) Also at Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907.
    c) Also at School of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907; electronic mail: bashir@purdue.edu
    Appl. Phys. Lett. 86, 153901 (2005); http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.1900315
/content/aip/journal/apl/86/15/10.1063/1.1900315
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/apl/86/15/10.1063/1.1900315

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Current–voltage characteristics of the break-junction before and after the formation of the nanogap. On average, current at 0.5 V dropped from to less than 0.3 nA after nanogap formation. Devices with leakage current less than 1 nA were considered to be candidate devices for DNA docking. Inset (a) shows SEM images of the break-junction structure before electromigration, and inset (b) shows the sketch and FESEM image of one of the structures where nanogap was formed.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

(a) Comparison of current–voltage characteristics of conduction through bare nanogaps, with DNA docked in it for Sequences 1 and 3, and for the control chip after incubation in nonthiolated Sequence 1, where no conduction was observed. (b) Two representative plots for Sequence 1 show decrease in conduction after temperature cycling. Conduction was restored after reincubation and temperature cycling step.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Current–voltage plots of the three DNA sequences. Close to 0 voltage, the resistance decreases with increasing GC content. The resistivity values assume a single molecule, 6.7 nm long and 2 nm in diameter. Inset shows a number of plots for Sequences 1 and 3, all measured on different devices.

Tables

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Table I.

The three 18-mer DNA sequences and their melting temperatures, used in our experiments.

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/content/aip/journal/apl/86/15/10.1063/1.1900315
2005-04-05
2014-04-24
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Direct current electrical characterization of ds-DNA in nanogap junctions
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/apl/86/15/10.1063/1.1900315
10.1063/1.1900315
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