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Integrated reactive ion etching to pattern cross-linked hydrophilic polymer structures for protein immobilization
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10.1063/1.2721236
/content/aip/journal/apl/90/14/10.1063/1.2721236
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/apl/90/14/10.1063/1.2721236
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Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Schemes I and II used for fabrication of microhydrogel features. Scheme I: 1 Liquid phase molecular self-assembly (Ref. 11) of polymerizable monolayer (Ref. 26) over thermally oxidized silicon wafer. 2 Thin film of hydrogel containing acid functional group was polymerized on wafer and sacrificial wafer was used for planarization (Ref. 27) 3 Sacrificial wafer was removed and hydrogel film was dehydrated in ethanol, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and photoresist were spin coated, and projection photolithography was employed to pattern photoresist. 4 Anisotropic oxygen based reactive ion etch (RIE) (Refs. 12 and 28) was used to etch exposed PMMA and hydrogel film using photoresist as a mask. 5 Photoresist and PMMA were removed using acetone and protein A was covalently immobilized on the hydrogel via amide bonds (Ref. 20). Scheme II : 6 Projection photolithography was used to define the shapes of molds. 7 Vapor phase molecular self-assembly (Ref. 11) of polymerizable monolayer (Ref. 29) and thin hydrogel film containing acid functional group was polymerized on the wafer using sacrificial wafer for planarization (Ref. 27). (Vapor-phase molecular self-assembly of polymerizable monolayer was used in order to avoid the liquid organic solvents which would dissolve the photoresist molds.) 8 Timed isotropic oxygen RIE (Refs. 12 and 28) was used to etch hydrogel film leaving behind the hydrogel features inside the molds. 9 Photoresist was removed using acetone and protein A was covalently immobilized on the hydrogel via amide bond (Ref. 20).

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Hydrogel features made by Scheme I before (a) and after [(b) and (c)] aqueous processing. The swelling distorted the shapes during aqueous immobilization of (b) 5-(aminoacetamido)fluorescein and (c) protein A. Scale bar: .

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Defects during processing by Scheme I. Patterned photoresist on nonconformal polymethylmethacrylate (a) resulted in defects in the hydrogel patterns after oxygen etch (b).

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Hydrogel features made by Scheme II before (a) and after [(b) and (c)] aqueous processing. The shapes were preserved during aqueous immobilization of (b) 5-(aminoacetamido)fluorescein and (c) protein A since no swelling took place. Scale bar: .

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/content/aip/journal/apl/90/14/10.1063/1.2721236
2007-04-06
2014-04-23
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Integrated reactive ion etching to pattern cross-linked hydrophilic polymer structures for protein immobilization
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/apl/90/14/10.1063/1.2721236
10.1063/1.2721236
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