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Integrated carbon fiber electrodes within hollow polymer microneedles for transdermal electrochemical sensing
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10.1063/1.3569945
/content/aip/journal/bmf/5/1/10.1063/1.3569945
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/bmf/5/1/10.1063/1.3569945
View: Figures

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Computer-aided design drawing of the microneedle array that was fabricated using the digital micromirror device-based stereolithography instrument.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Schematic showing steps used for assembly of the microneedle device.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Optical images of (a) an array of carbon fiber electrodes (scale ) and (b) a single carbon fiber electrode (scale ).

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

MTT viability data for cells grown on e-Shell 200 acrylate-based polymer and glass cover slip. (a) MTT viability of human epidermal keratinocytes grown on e-Shell 200 acrylate-based polymer compared to glass cover slip. A and B denote statistical differences between the polymer and the control. (b) MTT viability of human dermal fibroblasts grown on e-Shell 200 acrylate-based polymer compared to glass coverslip. A and B denote statistical differences between the polymer and the control.

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Scanning electron microscopy image of hollow microneedles prior to incorporation of carbon fiber electrodes: (a) plan view of hollow microneedle array and (b) isometric view of single hollow microneedle.

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Images of microneedle array and cadaveric porcine skin after microneedle insertion. (a) Optical micrograph showing delivery of trypan blue into microneedle-fabricated pores within cadaveric porcine skin (scale bar ). (b) Optical micrograph showing hollow microneedles before insertion into cadaveric porcine skin. (c) Optical micrograph showing hollow microneedles after insertion into cadaveric porcine skin.

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

Scanning electron microscopy images of hollow microneedles after incorporation of carbon fiber electrodes: (a) plan view of electrode-hollow microneedle array and (b) isometric view of single electrode-hollow microneedle.

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

Cyclic voltammetric scan of 5 mM ferricyanide in 1 M KCl vs Ag/AgCl and Pt reference counterelectrodes, respectively, at a scan rate of 100 mV/s.

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

Cyclic voltammetric scans of 0, 50, 100, 300, and hydrogen peroxide (pink, black, green, blue, and red curves) vs Ag/AgCl and Pt reference counterelectrodes, respectively, at a scan rate of 100 mV/s.

Image of FIG. 10.
FIG. 10.

Linear sweep voltammograms of 0 mM (black) and 1 mM (red) ascorbic acid in 100 mM phosphate buffer vs Ag/AgCl and Pt reference counterelectrodes, respectively, at a scan rate of 100 mV/s.

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/content/aip/journal/bmf/5/1/10.1063/1.3569945
2011-03-30
2014-04-17
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Integrated carbon fiber electrodes within hollow polymer microneedles for transdermal electrochemical sensing
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/bmf/5/1/10.1063/1.3569945
10.1063/1.3569945
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