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A capillary dielectrophoretic chip for real-time blood cell separation from a drop of whole blood
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10.1063/1.4802269
    + View Affiliations - Hide Affiliations
    Affiliations:
    1 Department of Biomedical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan
    2 DELBio Inc.,Taiwan
    3 Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan
    4 Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan
    5 Medical Device Innovation Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan
    a) Author to whom correspondence should be addressed. Electronic mail: hcchang@mail.ncku.edu.tw. Tel.: +886-6-2757575 ext 63426. Fax: +886-6-2343270.
    Biomicrofluidics 7, 024110 (2013); http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4802269
/content/aip/journal/bmf/7/2/10.1063/1.4802269
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/bmf/7/2/10.1063/1.4802269
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Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

(a) Schematic illustration of the chip assembly. Doublesided tape (height of 30 m) was used to bond the hydrophilic membrane and electrode chip together. (b) Image of the capillary dielectrophoretic chip. (c) Result of blood cells separation in the chip. (d) Schematic illustration of the blood cell separation process on the chip.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

(a) and (b) Gradient of E and negative field gradient for the negative DEP force in the horizontal plane for the symmetrical electrode (left: the electrode gap is 100 m; right: the electrode gap is 50 m). The surfaces indicate the gradient of E, and the arrows indicate the negative field gradients of the negative DEP force. (c) The magnitudes of the gradient of E profile in the horizontal positions (y = 50 m) with various electrode gaps. (d) The magnitudes of the gradient of E profile in vertical positions with various electrode gaps. (e) The magnitudes of the electric field profile in the horizontal positions (y = 50 m) with various electrode gaps. (f) The magnitudes of the electric field profile in vertical positions with various electrode gaps.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

(a) Sequential images of the blood cell separation at times of 0, 10, 20, and 30 s following sample introduction. (b) The relationships between separation efficiency and separating time for various electrode gaps when an AC voltage of 20 V at 100 kHz was applied.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

The relationships between separation efficiency and the separating time for various applied voltages at the frequency of 100 kHz for the whole blood (40% hematocrit).

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

The relationships between separation efficiency and the separating times for various hematocrit values when an AC voltage of 20 V at 100 kHz was applied.

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

(a) The blood cells homogenously covered the electrode surface following sample introduction. (b) Separation of the blood cells from whole blood when an AC voltage of 20 V at 100 kHz was applied for 30 s. The dashed line represents the working electrode. (c) Comparison of the current responses of the blood glucose from whole blood at the 3rd second when a DC voltage of 0.6 V was applied.

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/content/aip/journal/bmf/7/2/10.1063/1.4802269
2013-04-18
2014-04-20
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: A capillary dielectrophoretic chip for real-time blood cell separation from a drop of whole blood
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/bmf/7/2/10.1063/1.4802269
10.1063/1.4802269
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