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Robust detection of dynamic community structure in networks
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10.1063/1.4790830
/content/aip/journal/chaos/23/1/10.1063/1.4790830
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/chaos/23/1/10.1063/1.4790830
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Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

An important property of many real-world networks is community structure, in which there exist cohesive groups of nodes such that a network has stronger connections within such groups than it does between such groups. Community structure often changes in time, which can lead to the rearrangement of cohesive groups, the formation of new groups, and the fragmentation of existing groups.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Methodological considerations important in the investigation of dynamic community structure in temporal networks. (A) Depending on the system under study, a single network layer (which is represented using an ordinary adjacency matrix with an extra index to indicate the layer) might by definition only allow edges from some subset of the complete set of node pairs, as is the case in the depicted chain-like graph. We call such a situation partial connectivity. (B) Although the most common optimization null model employs random graphs (e.g., the Newman-Girvan null model, which is closely related to the configuration model 1,16 ), other models can also provide important insights into network community structure. (C) After determining a set of partitions that maximize the modularity Q (or a similar quality function), it is interesting to test whether the community structure is different from, for example, what would be expected with a scrambling of time layers (i.e., a temporal null model) or node identities (i.e., a nodal null model). 4

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Network layers and community assignments from two example data sets: (A) a brain network based on correlations between blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signals 4 and (B) a behavioral network based on similarities in movement times during a simple motor learning experiment. 13 We use these data sets to illustrate situations with categorical nodes and ordered nodes, respectively. In the bottom panels, we show community assignments obtained using multilayer community detection for (C) the brain networks and (D) the behavioral networks.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Modularity-optimization null models. (A) Example layer from a behavioral network. (B) Newman-Girvan and (C) chain null models for the layer shown in panel (A). (D) Optimized multilayer modularity value Q, (E) number of communities n, and (F) mean community size s for the complete multilayer behavioral network employing the Newman-Girvan (black) and chain (red) optimization null models as a function of the structural resolution parameter γ. (G)Optimized modularity value Q, (H) number of communities n, and (I) mean community size s for the multilayer behavioral network employing chain optimization null models as a function of the effective fraction of edges that have larger weights than their null-model counterparts. We averaged the values of Q, n, and s over the 3 different 12-note sequences and C = 100 optimizations. Box plots in (D-F) indicate quartiles and 95% confidence intervals over the 22 individuals in the study. The error bars in panels (G-I) indicate a standard deviation from the mean. In some instances, this is smaller than the line width. The temporal resolution-parameter value is .

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Modularity-optimization null models for time series. (A) Example coherence matrix averaged over layers from a brain network. (B) Random time shuffle, (C) FT surrogate, and (D) AAFT surrogate null models averaged over layers. (E) Coherence of each matrix type averaged over subjects, scans, and layers. We note that the apparent lack of structure in (B) is partially related to its significantly decreased coherence in comparison to the other models. (F) Optimized modularity values Q, (G) number of communities n, and (H) mean community size s for the multilayer brain network employing the Newman-Girvan (black), random time-shuffle (blue), FT surrogate (gray), and AAFT surrogate (red) optimization null models as functions of the structural resolution parameter γ. We averaged the values of these diagnostics over 3 different scanning sessions and C = 100 optimizations. Box plots indicate quartiles and 95% confidence intervals over the 20 individuals in the study. The temporal resolution parameter is .

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Post-optimization null models. We compare four multilayer diagnostics (optimized modularity, number of communities, mean community size, and stationarity) and two single-layer diagnostics (mean and variance of Qs ) for (A) brain and (B) behavioral networks with the connectional (row 1), nodal (row 2), and temporal (row 3) null-model networks. Box plots indicate quartiles and 95% confidence intervals over the individuals and experimental conditions. The structural resolution parameter is , and the temporal resolution parameter is .

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

Optimized modularity Q and Rand z-score as functions of the resolution parameters γ and ω for the (A) brain and (B) behavioral networks. The top row shows the mean value of maximized Q over C = 100 optimizations and the mean partition similarity z over all possible pairs of the C partitions. The bottom row shows the variance of maximized Q over the optimizations and the variance of the partition similarity over all possible pairs of partitions. The results shown in this figure come from a single individual and experimental scan, but we obtain qualitatively similar results for other individuals and scans. Note that the axis scalings are nonlinear.

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

Differences, as a function of γ and ω, between the real networks and the (A,B) nodal and (C,D) temporal null models for maximized modularity Q and partition similarity z for the (A,C) brain and (B,D) behavioral networks. The first row in each panel gives the difference in the mean values of the diagnostic variables between the real and null-model networks. Panels (A,B) show the results for and , and panels (C,D) show the results for and . The quantities Q and z again denote the modularity and partition similarity of the real network, Qn and zn denote the modularity and partition similarity of the nodal null-model network, and Qt and zt denote the modularity and partition similarity of the temporal null-model network. The second row in each panel gives the difference between the optimization variance of the real network and the randomization variance of the null-model network for the same diagnostic variable pairs. The third row in each panel gives the difference in the optimization variance of the real network and the optimization variance of the null-model network for the same diagnostic variable pairs. We show results for a single individual and scan in the experiment, but results are qualitatively similar for other individuals and scans. Note that the axis scalings are nonlinear.

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

Dynamic community detection in a network of Kuramoto oscillators. (A, top) The coupling matrix between N = 128 phase oscillators contains 8 communities, each of which has 16 nodes. (A, bottom) Over time, oscillators synchronize with one another. Color indicates the mean phase correlation between oscillators, where hotter (darker gray) colors indicate stronger correlations. (B) Phase correlation between oscillators as a function of time. The mean phase correlation between oscillators in the same community (dashed red curve) increases faster than the mean phase correlation between all oscillators in the system (solid gray curve). Regime I encompasses the first 50 time steps, and regime II emcompasses the subsequent 50 time steps. (C) Variance of maximized multilayer modularity (left), number of communities (middle), and partition similarity z (right) over 100 optimizations of the multilayer modularity quality function for the temporal network in regime II as a function of the structural resolution parameter for . The shaded gray area indicates values of the structural resolution parameter that provide 0 variance in the number of communities. (D) Example partition of the temporal network in regime II at , which occurs near the troughs in panel (C). (E) Example partition of the temporal network in regime I at . (F) Number of communities as a function of time for (left) the temporal network in regime I and (right) its corresponding temporal null model. We averaged values over C = 100 optimizations of multilayer modularity.

Image of FIG. 10.
FIG. 10.

Constructing representative partitions for an example brain network layer. (A) Partitions extracted during C optimizations of the quality function Q. (B) The N × N nodal association matrix T, whose elements indicate the number of times node i and node j have been assigned to the same community. (C) The N × N random nodal association matrix , whose elements indicate the number of times node i and node j are expected to be assigned to the same community by chance. (D) The thresholded nodal association matrix , where elements with values less than those expected by chance have been set to 0. (E) Partitions extracted during C = 100 optimizations of the single-layer modularity quality function Qs for the matrix T from panel (D). Note that each of the C optimizations yields the same partition. (F) Visualization of the representative partition given in (E). 82 We have reordered the nodes in the matrices in panels (A-E) for better visualization of community structure.

Image of FIG. 11.
FIG. 11.

Representative partitions of multilayer brain networks for an example subject and scan. (A) Partitions extracted for C = 100 optimizations of the quality function Q on the real multilayer network (112 nodes × 25 time windows, which yields 2800 nodes in total). Partitions extracted for C randomizations for the (B) temporal and (C) nodal null-model networks. (D) Partitions extracted for C optimizations of the quality function Q of the thresholded nodal association matrix for the (D) real, (E) temporal null-model, and (F) nodal null-model networks. Note that the partitioning is robust to multiple optimizations. We have reordered the nodes in each column for better visualization of community structure. The structural resolution parameter is , and the temporal resolution parameter is .

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/content/aip/journal/chaos/23/1/10.1063/1.4790830
2013-03-18
2014-04-24
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Robust detection of dynamic community structure in networks
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/chaos/23/1/10.1063/1.4790830
10.1063/1.4790830
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