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Vascularization with trees that alternate with upside-down trees
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10.1063/1.2723186
/content/aip/journal/jap/101/9/10.1063/1.2723186
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jap/101/9/10.1063/1.2723186

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Line-to-line tree channels (Ref. 8). In this drawing, each tree has two levels of pairing or bifurcation , and, consequently, the flow rate through the trunk is approximately four times the flow rate through each of the smallest channels of the canopy.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Volume element vascularized with two sets of parallel channels in the counterflow.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

The change in channel cross-section size from mother to daughter channels: (a) the channels have the same shape (square); (b) the channels have the same depth .

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

The optimization of the channel cross-sectional shape when all the channels of the tree have the same depth .

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

The effect of tree architecture porosity and channels depth on the optimized global flow rate .

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

The effect of channels depth and porosity on the flow rates through the trees and parallel channels structures.

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

The geometry of inlets, junctions and outlets projected on the plane .

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

The effect of the overall pressure difference on the flow rates through tree-shaped and parallel-channels structures (, cases 1–5 of Table II).

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

The effect of porosity or svelteness on mass flow rates (, cases 7–11).

Image of FIG. 10.
FIG. 10.

Numerical results showing the effect of the number of pairing levels .

Image of FIG. 11.
FIG. 11.

The effect of the imposed pressure difference on the flow rate and Re distribution through the channels of the architecture.

Image of FIG. 12.
FIG. 12.

(a) The effect of porosity on flow rate maldistribution (cases 7–11, ); (b) the Re distribution for case 7 (, ); (c) the Re distribution for case 11 (, ).

Image of FIG. 13.
FIG. 13.

The effect of the number of pairing levels on the flow rate maldistribution (cases 2, 6, 8, and 12).

Image of FIG. 14.
FIG. 14.

The domain of allowable tree designs in which adjacent trees do not interfere with each other.

Image of FIG. 15.
FIG. 15.

The effect of channel depth and the ratio of smallest length scales on the relative goodness of tree-shaped vascularization .

Tables

Generic image for table
Table I.

Parameters used in the analysis.

Generic image for table
Table II.

Cases selected for numerical simulation.

Generic image for table
Table III.

Mesh independence test for cases 1 and 5 of Table II.

Generic image for table
Table IV.

The effect of changing the tree flow direction when : comparison between trees and of Fig. 3 (number of cells).

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/content/aip/journal/jap/101/9/10.1063/1.2723186
2007-05-04
2014-04-20
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Vascularization with trees that alternate with upside-down trees
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jap/101/9/10.1063/1.2723186
10.1063/1.2723186
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