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Impact of mechanical stress on gate tunneling currents of germanium and silicon -type metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors and metal gate work function
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10.1063/1.2838234
/content/aip/journal/jap/103/6/10.1063/1.2838234
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jap/103/6/10.1063/1.2838234
View: Figures

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Schematic illustration of carrier separation measurement of -MOSFET and four-point wafer bending. The gate tunneling current can be separated into electrons and holes tunneling from gate and substrate, respectively (Ref. 39).

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

(a) Source/drain and substrate tunneling current as a function of gate voltage for Ge -MOSFET. (b) and as a function of for Si -MOSFET.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Relative change in of Si and Ge -MOSFET as a function of stress. Symbols and lines are measured data and modeling, respectively. The magnitude of hole tunneling current change in Ge is approximately 4 times larger than that in Si.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

(a) A schematic band diagram for the hole gate tunneling current in a -MOSFET on a (100) wafer. (b) and subbands shift under stress results in hole repopulation into subband, which has lower tunneling barrier height and smaller out-of-plane effective mass. (c) Strain-altered out-of-plane effective mass for each subband is listed.

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Valence band-edge splitting of Ge and Si under tensile stress along [110] (not including confinement). Ge has larger valence band-edge splitting than Si.

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Charge density vs applied stress for the top , bottom , and third subbands at an inversion charge density of for (a) Ge and (b) Si, respectively. Strain-altered out-of-plane effective mass of each subband is denoted (e.g., 0.12 ). Note, due to larger valence band-edge splitting of Ge, hole repopulation in Ge is more than in Si.

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

Relative change in of Ge -MOSFET as a function of stress at gate bias of . Due to decreased work function of TiN gate, electron gate tunneling current from TiN gate increases up to with 100 MPa of stress. The inset shows the decreased tunneling barrier height via strain by the decreased work function of TiN gate.

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

(a) curve of MOS capacitor, measured at 100 kHz. is extracted from (Ref. 40). (b) shift as a function of tensile and compressive stress. decreases /increases with tension/compression.

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

Work-function shifts of TaN, bulk Al, and bulk Cu as a function of stress (Ref. 33). Work functions of three different metal increase/decrease with compressive/tensile stress. Line is the linear fit of extracted data.

Image of FIG. 10.
FIG. 10.

Relative changes in gate tunneling current of MOS capacitor with TaN gate as a function of stress. Symbols and lines are measured data and modeling, respectively.

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/content/aip/journal/jap/103/6/10.1063/1.2838234
2008-03-24
2014-04-23
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Impact of mechanical stress on gate tunneling currents of germanium and silicon p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors and metal gate work function
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jap/103/6/10.1063/1.2838234
10.1063/1.2838234
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