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Optimizing the Ar–Xe infrared laser on the Naval Research Laboratory’s Electra generator
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10.1063/1.2948934
/content/aip/journal/jap/104/1/10.1063/1.2948934
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jap/104/1/10.1063/1.2948934
View: Figures

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Main elements of the reaction kinetics of the Ar–Xe laser, as currently understood, are diagrammed. Vertical scale shows the energies of key states in eV.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Schematic of the Ar–Xe laser cell as implemented on Electra, with associated diagnostic instruments. Sometimes, five photodiodes were deployed behind a single output coupler instead of two or three linked to individual output couplers as is shown in the figure.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Photodiode signals (proportional to power at ) are shown as a function of time and space for an Electra shot in which the total energy deposited was 577 J, the Xe fraction 1%, and the total pressure, 2.0 atm. A full aperture output coupler had a reflectivity of 6.5%. The e-beam originated at 0.0 cm, depicted at the top of the graph section. Also shown on the same time scale is the diode power. Linear interpolation was used to fill in the grid between the five photodiodes which were located at 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 cm from the entrance foil.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Intrinsic efficiency as a function of e-beam power deposition density for a 99:1 Ar–Xe mixture at a total pressure of 2.5 atm. Uncertainties associated with the measurements are shown as error bars. Output coupler reflectivity is 0.337. Open squares are measured data and triangles are model calculations.

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Head-on view of laser aperture under the experimentally optimized efficiency conditions of Fig. 4, depicting calculated e-beam absorption and measured laser emission in three 10 cm segments.

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Interferometrically measured peak electron density at midpoint of the laser cell is plotted vs e-beam power deposition density. The corresponding model-calculated electron density is also shown. The total pressure is 2.5 atm and the Xe fraction is 1%.

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

Measured laser irradiance as a function of output coupler reflectivity is plotted for various Xe fractions: (a) 0.5% Xe, (b) 1.0% Xe, and (c) 2.5% Xe. Also shown are least-squares fits to the Rigrod formula and the corresponding inferred saturation intensities and small signal gains. The pressure was 2.5 atm and average deposition power was .

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

Gain in the laser transition, inferred from the least-squares fits of Fig. 7, and also calculated from the kinetics model, is plotted as a function of Xe fraction.

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

The saturation intensity of the laser transition, inferred from the least-squares fits of Fig. 7, and also calculated from the kinetics model, is plotted as a function of Xe fraction.

Image of FIG. 10.
FIG. 10.

Measured and model-calculated fluences at are plotted as a function of Xe fraction, for the same conditions of Figs. 7–9.

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/content/aip/journal/jap/104/1/10.1063/1.2948934
2008-07-02
2014-04-18
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Optimizing the Ar–Xe infrared laser on the Naval Research Laboratory’s Electra generator
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jap/104/1/10.1063/1.2948934
10.1063/1.2948934
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