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Effects of nanoparticle charging on streamer development in transformer oil-based nanofluids
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10.1063/1.3267474
/content/aip/journal/jap/107/1/10.1063/1.3267474
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jap/107/1/10.1063/1.3267474

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Nanoparticle of an arbitrary material with a radius , permittivity , and conductivity , surrounded by transformer oil with a permittivity of and conductivity stressed by a uniform -directed electric field turned on at .

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Electric field lines for various times after a uniform -directed electric field is turned on at around a perfectly conducting spherical nanoparticle of radius surrounded by transformer oil with permittivity , conductivity , and free electrons with uniform charge density and mobility . The thick electric field lines terminate on the particle at and , where and separate field lines that terminate on the nanoparticle from field lines that go around the particle. The cylindrical radius of Eq. (27) of the separation field line at defines the charging current in Eq. (29). The cylindrical radius of Eq. (28) defines the separation field line at . The dominant charge carrier in charging the nanoparticles are electrons because of their much higher mobilities than positive and negative ions. The conductivity of transformer oil, , is much less than the effective conductivity of the electrons, . The electrons charge each nanoparticle to saturation, as given in Eq. (8) with time constant given in Eq. (12). The electric field lines in this figure were plotted using MATHEMATICA StreamPlot (Ref. 18). (a) (b) (c) (d) .

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Charging dynamics, , of a perfectly conducting nanoparticle vs time in transformer oil as given by Eq. (13) with (approximately equals 11 electrons) and .

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Screenshot of the closed form solution for in Eq. (20) generated by MATHEMATICA when numerical values are given to each variable (e.g., , , , , , , , , , and ).

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Charging dynamics, , of a nanoparticle with constant conductivity and varying permittivity (○), (▽), and (×) in transformer oil (, ). The other charging parameter values used, such as , , , , , and , are the same as given in Sec. III A, just after Eq. (13). (a) . (b) . (c) .

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Initial of the charging dynamics, , for particles with conductivity of and varying permittivity .

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

Computer-aided design representation of the needle-sphere electrode geometry used for streamer simulation purposes and detailed in the IEC 60897 standard (Ref. 24).

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

(a) Laplacian electric field magnitude [V/m] spatial distribution (i.e., ) at for applied step voltage near the radius needle electrode apex at the origin. The sphere electrode (not shown) is at , . (b) Laplacian electric field magnitude distribution along the needle-sphere -axis. The field enhancement is largest near the sharp needle tip quickly decreasing as increases.

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

Temporal dynamics along the needle-sphere electrode axis at intervals from to given by the solution to the streamer model of Eqs. (37)–(42) for and . The solution is identical to the pure oil case. (a) Electric field distribution. (b) Net space charge density distribution. (c) Temperature distribution. The oil temperature at time is .

Image of FIG. 10.
FIG. 10.

Electric field distribution along the needle-sphere electrode axis at given by the solutions to the streamer model of Eqs. (37)–(42) for the three NF case studies with different nanoparticle attachment time constants and the pure transformer oil.

Image of FIG. 11.
FIG. 11.

(a) Charge density distributions along the needle-sphere electrode axis at time given by the solution to the streamer model for transformer oil and transformer oil-based NF with and varying . (a) Pure transformer oil. (b) transformer oil-based nanofluid. (c) transformer oil-based nanofluid (d) transformer oil-based nanofluid.

Image of FIG. 12.
FIG. 12.

Electric potential distribution along the needle-sphere electrode axis at given by the solution of the NF field ionization case studies and the equivalent solution in pure oil. The needle tip is at and the streamer tail is to the left of the knee, where the slope changes dramatically, in each electric potential plot. The location of the streamer tip is at the knee in each electric potential plot.

Tables

Generic image for table
Table I.

Results of impulse voltage withstand testing in electrode gap system (Ref. 2).

Generic image for table
Table II.

Electrical and thermal properties of representative insulating and conducting nanoparticle materials.

Generic image for table
Table III.

Field ionization parameter values.

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/content/aip/journal/jap/107/1/10.1063/1.3267474
2010-01-06
2014-04-17
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Effects of nanoparticle charging on streamer development in transformer oil-based nanofluids
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jap/107/1/10.1063/1.3267474
10.1063/1.3267474
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