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The calibration of carbon nanotube based bionanosensors
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10.1063/1.3435316
/content/aip/journal/jap/107/12/10.1063/1.3435316
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jap/107/12/10.1063/1.3435316

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Cantilevered nanotube resonator with attached masses. Here, deoxythymidine is used as an example. (a) Original configuration with a point mass at the tip; (b) original configuration with distributed masses; (c) mathematical idealization with a point mass at the tip; and (d) mathematical idealization with distributed masses.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Bridged nanotube resonator with attached masses. Like the cantilevered case, deoxythymidine is used as an example. (a) Original configuration with a point mass at the center; (b) original configuration with distributed masses; (c) mathematical idealization with a point mass at the center; (d) mathematical idealization with distributed masses.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Identified attached masses from the frequency shift in a cantilevered CNT. The proposed calibration constant based approach is validated using data from the molecular mechanics simulations. The importance of using the calibration constant varying with the length of the mass can be seen in (b). The point mass assumption often used in cantilevered sensors, can result in significant error when the mass is distributed in nature.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Identified attached masses from the frequency shift in a bridged CNT. The proposed calibration constant based approach is validated using data from the molecular mechanics simulations. Again, the importance of using the calibration constant varying with the length of the mass can be seen in (b). However, the difference between the point mass and distributed mass assumption is not as significant as the cantilevered case.

Tables

Generic image for table
Table I.

The stiffness and mass calibration constants for CNT based bionanosensor. The value of indicates the length of the mass as a fraction of the length of the CNT.

Generic image for table
Table II.

Natural frequencies of a (5,5) CNT in THz—cantilever boundary condition. First four natural frequencies obtained from the present approach is compared with the MD simulation46 for different values of the aspect ratio.

Generic image for table
Table III.

Percentage error in the mass detection using cantilevered CNT based bionanosensor. The average errors for the point and distributed mass cases are, respectively, 16.1520% and 5.3581%.

Generic image for table
Table IV.

Percentage error in the mass detection using bridged CNT based bionanosensor. The average errors for the point and distributed mass cases are, respectively, 6.1226% and 11.3554%.

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/content/aip/journal/jap/107/12/10.1063/1.3435316
2010-06-28
2014-04-21
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: The calibration of carbon nanotube based bionanosensors
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jap/107/12/10.1063/1.3435316
10.1063/1.3435316
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