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Low temperature exfoliation process in hydrogen-implanted germanium layers
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10.1063/1.3326942
/content/aip/journal/jap/107/5/10.1063/1.3326942
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jap/107/5/10.1063/1.3326942

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Optical graph of surface blisters in hydrogen-implanted germanium following a 22 h anneal at and a 5 min anneal at . Surface blisters reflect the formation of coalescing microcracks in the implanted region of bulk germanium.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

(a) Low magnification X-TEM of the defective region created by implant, in as-implanted germanium. A dose implanted at 180 keV generates a 600 nm thick implant-damaged region (region II) below a damage-free 150 nm thick region under the germanium surface (region I). Below the damaged region, dark cavities are observed (region III) which are of lesser interest in our study. (b1) low magnification X-TEM of hydrogen-implanted germanium following a 22 h anneal at showing the formation of nanocracks at a depth close to the projected range, (b2) high magnification TEM of nanocracks parallel to the substrate surface (same implant and anneal conditions as b1); (c1) low magnification TEM of hydrogen-implanted germanium following a 22 h anneal at and a 5 min anneal at showing the transformation of nanocracks in an almost continuous and thick microcrack line at 645 nm below the germanium surface; (c2) high magnification TEM of a microcrack illustrating its creation by formation of spherical gas pockets (same implant and anneal conditions as c1).

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

XRD patterns: (a) impact of STA on strain relaxation in hydrogen implanted germanium after long anneals at ; (b) impact of thermal budget during the nucleation process on implant-induced strain after STA at .

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

AFM scans of implanted and annealed germanium, (a) following an anneal at for 22 h and a short anneal at for 5 min ( scan area); (b) following an anneal at for 22 h and a short anneal at for 5 min ( scan area).

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

XRD patterns: (a) impact of STA on lattice deformation in hydrogen implanted germanium after long time anneals at ; (b) impact of thermal budget during the nucleation process on the lattice deformation caused by the STA at .

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Scanning electron microscopy graphs of the GeOI sample resulting from an exfoliation carried out after a 24 h long anneal at and a STA at for 5 min: (a) cross-sectional view of the germanium//silicon patterned structure. A 680 nm thick germanium layer is transferred for the donor germanium wafer to the host silicon wafer (b) top-down tilted view of the germanium surface exposed after complete exfoliation.

Tables

Generic image for table
Table I.

Germanium surface roughness, as measured by AFM, following long time anneals at low temperature . Scan area is unless specified.

Generic image for table
Table II.

Germanium surface roughness, as measured by AFM, following long time anneals at low temperature and STA at 200 or . Scan area is unless specified.

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/content/aip/journal/jap/107/5/10.1063/1.3326942
2010-03-09
2014-04-25
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Low temperature exfoliation process in hydrogen-implanted germanium layers
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jap/107/5/10.1063/1.3326942
10.1063/1.3326942
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