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Influence of hole geometry and lattice constant on extraordinary optical transmission through subwavelength hole arrays in metal films
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10.1063/1.3327217
/content/aip/journal/jap/107/7/10.1063/1.3327217
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jap/107/7/10.1063/1.3327217

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

SEM images of three shaped subwavelength hole arrays samples made from (a) circular hole, (b) rectangular hole, and (c) trapezoidal hole.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Calculated transmission spectra for a rectangular hole sample at different plane-wave numbers. This test calculation shows good numerical convergence of the plane-wave transfer-matrix method. The lattice constant of the rectangular hole structure is and the hole size is .

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

(a) Measured and (b) calculated transmission spectra for circular hole arrays with different lattice constants and hole radius. The legend list lattice constant and hole radius, and the arrows denote the wavelengths of transmission peak.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

(a) Experimental and (b) simulation results for the wavelength of the transmission peak and transmission dip as functions of hole radius and lattice constant. The legends list the orders of transmission peak and dip, and also the lattice constant, respectively.

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

(a) Measured transmission spectra for rectangular hole arrays samples as depicted in Fig. 1(b). (b) Calculated transmission spectra for ideal rectangular hole arrays with sharp corners. (c) Calculated transmission spectra for practically truncated rectangular hole arrays with the sharp corners truncated, which better conforms to real structure shapes as illustrated in Fig. 1(b). The legends list the lattice constant, the long and short side lengths of the hole, respectively, and the black arrows in (a) indicate the transmission peak.

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

(a) Measured transmission spectra for the trapezoidal hole (with base angle 60°) arrays samples as depicted in Fig. 1(c). (b) Calculated transmission spectra for ideal trapezoidal hole arrays with sharp corners. (c) Calculated transmission spectra for practical truncated trapezoidal hole arrays with the sharp corners truncated, which better conform to real structure shapes as illustrated in Fig. 1(c). The legends list the lattice constant, the upper width, and lower width of the trapezoid, respectively, and the black arrows in (a) indicate the transmission peak.

Tables

Generic image for table
Table I.

Experimental measurement results of the wavelength of the transmission peak and dip of the circular (hole radius is 260 nm), rectangular (hole size is ), and trapezoidal (hole size is ) hole array samples for different diffraction orders at the lattice constant of 1.0 and , respectively.

Generic image for table
Table II.

Same as in Table I, but for the theoretical calculation results simulated by PWTMM. Rectangular and trapezoidal air holes with ideally sharp corners and practically truncated corners are considered.

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/content/aip/journal/jap/107/7/10.1063/1.3327217
2010-04-01
2014-04-17
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Influence of hole geometry and lattice constant on extraordinary optical transmission through subwavelength hole arrays in metal films
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jap/107/7/10.1063/1.3327217
10.1063/1.3327217
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