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How to use a nanowire to measure vibrational frequencies: Device simulator results
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10.1063/1.3459896
/content/aip/journal/jap/108/1/10.1063/1.3459896
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jap/108/1/10.1063/1.3459896

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

The upper part of the diagram shows the energy profile experienced by the electrons when a bias has been applied. The horizontal lines within the wells indicate the energies of confined states and the arrow between the wells represents the tunneling path of the electron which loses energy to a phonon in order to conserve energy. The gray boxes represent states in the leads populated by electrons. The lower part of the diagram indicates which parts of the device correspond to the features in the energy landscape.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Left: (a) device with a single InP barrier. (b) Device with two InP barriers that create an InAs quantum dot. Right: the band offset at an InAs–InP junction

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Current vs voltage for two single barrier devices at room temperature. The upper curve corresponds to a barrier width of 70 Å, and the lower curve to a barrier width of 800 Å. A carrier concentration of and wire radius of 250 Å were assumed, and the temperature is 300 K.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

In the left figure is shown the current vs voltage for a double barrier device at 4.2 K for two carrier concentrations. The upper curve corresponds to a carrier concentration of (chemical potential is 0.038 eV) and the lower curve to (chemical potential is 0.022 eV). The right figure shows the transmission probability as a function of energy [ in Eq. (11) ] for a range of bias voltages. The position of the resonance at zero bias (0.06 eV) corresponds to the energy of the resonance state in the well. Note the sharpness of the transmission and the strong variation in the peak transmission with voltage. A wire radius of 250 Å is used throughout.

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

This figure shows how the transmission varies as the wire radius is increased from 200 Å (left) to 300 Å (right). The different colors correspond to different channels (values of and ). The barriers have width 25 Å and the wells have width 50 Å.

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

These figures show the effect of varying the outer barriers. Plotted is the variation in electron transmission with respect to the energy of the incident electron with no bias applied. The two well widths are 150 Å and the middle barrier width is 20 Å in both cases. In the left panel the outer barrier width is 10 Å while in the right panel it is 20 Å. The different colors correspond to different channels (values of and ).

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

These figures show the effect of varying the middle barrier width. Plotted is the variation in electron transmission with respect to the energy of the incident electron with no bias applied. The two well widths are 150 Å and the outer barrier width is 20 Å in both cases. In the left panel the middle barrier width is 10 Å while in the right panel it is 20 Å. The different line types correspond to different channels (values of and ).

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

These figures show the variation in electron transmission with respect to the energy of the incident electron with no bias applied. All the barrier widths are 30 Å in both cases. In the left panel the wells have width 150 Å while in the right panel the width is 100 Å. Note that the maximum transmission in each channel should be 1. The apparent drop in maximum transmission below 1 in the left panel is a result of a lack of resolution of the plots. The different colors correspond to different channels (values of and ).

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

These figures show the transmission as a function of the electron energy and refer to a nanowire with outer barrier widths of 20 Å, center barrier width of 25 Å, and well widths of 100 Å. In the left panel the bias is zero, while in the right panel the bias is 0.1 V. The different line types correspond to different channels (values of and ).

Image of FIG. 10.
FIG. 10.

These figures shows the variation in electric current with bias. The carrier concentration is . The left panel has results at two temperatures (4 and 300 K) and refers to a nanowire with outer barrier widths of 20 Å, center barrier width of 25 Å, and well widths of 100 Å. The right panel has results for 300 K with wider barriers (all 30 Å).

Image of FIG. 11.
FIG. 11.

This figure displays the current as a function of voltage for two values of the carrier density in the leads. The upper curve is for a carrier concentration of and the lower curve for a concentration of . There is roughly a factor of 10 increase in the current for a factor of 10 increase in the carrier density. All calculations are at 300 K with well widths of 100 Å, outer barrier widths of 20 Å, and middle barrier width of 25 Å.

Tables

Generic image for table
Table I.

Variation in electron chemical potential with dopant density at room temperature in an InAs nanowire of radius 200 Å.

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/content/aip/journal/jap/108/1/10.1063/1.3459896
2010-07-15
2014-04-20
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: How to use a nanowire to measure vibrational frequencies: Device simulator results
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jap/108/1/10.1063/1.3459896
10.1063/1.3459896
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