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Array of Josephson junctions with a nonsinusoidal current-phase relation as a model of the resistive transition of unconventional superconductors
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10.1063/1.3525984
/content/aip/journal/jap/108/12/10.1063/1.3525984
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jap/108/12/10.1063/1.3525984
View: Figures

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

(a) Two-dimensional Josephson junction array representing a granular superconductor. Circles represent superconducting grains. Crosses represent weak-links between grains. The bias current is injected to the left electrode and collected from the right electrode. (b) Equivalent circuit of the weak-link between the grains and . The linear resistor , the linear capacitor , the nonlinear inductor and memristor are connected in parallel. The current flows from grain to grain . is the voltage drop across the weak-link.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Josephson junction characteristics of a weak-link with current-phase relation (a) ; (b) with and ; (c) with and . The generalized Stewart–McCumber parameter is .

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Resistive transition of a two-dimensional network with current-phase relation of the form . The average value of the critical current is 1 mA. The curves correspond to different average values of the critical current , namely , , , and . The normal resistance is equal for all the junctions.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Resistive transition of a two-dimensional network with current-phase relation of the form . The average value of the critical current is 1 mA. The curves correspond to different average values of the critical current , namely, , , , and . The normal resistance is equal for all the junctions. Panels (b) and (c) show the details of the beginning and the end of the transition.

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Arrays of intrinsic Josephson junctions are naturally formed in cuprates by the planes separated by layers of insulating atoms. The hole doping of the planes affects transport and thermodynamic properties of cuprates. Several transport anomalies have been observed around that cannot be explained in the framework of a conventional picture of the intrinsic Josephson junctions and have been ascribed to the antiphase ordering across the planes (Refs. 51–57). The modulation of the phase can be taken into account by using the proposed array of resistively and capacitively nonsinusoidal Josephson junctions.

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Critical temperature as a function of the hole doping . The ideal parabolic relation is plotted as a reference (solid line). Circles are experimental data obtained on YBCO samples with varying doping level of the planes (Ref. 66). The suppression of in the range of doping between 0.08 and 0.17 can be observed.

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

Critical temperature (a) and currents (b) as a function of the hole doping . The data are obtained by simulating the network of Josephson junctions with current-phase relation given by . The average critical current of the array takes values in the range 1–10 mA. In order to yield the suppression of as a function of the doping level the component is reduced. In the inset of (b) the ratio of the components corresponding to the ideal parabolic behavior and the real curve is plotted.

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/content/aip/journal/jap/108/12/10.1063/1.3525984
2010-12-29
2014-04-20
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Array of Josephson junctions with a nonsinusoidal current-phase relation as a model of the resistive transition of unconventional superconductors
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jap/108/12/10.1063/1.3525984
10.1063/1.3525984
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