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A multiscale strength model for extreme loading conditions
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10.1063/1.3553718
/content/aip/journal/jap/109/7/10.1063/1.3553718
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jap/109/7/10.1063/1.3553718

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

(Color online) Demonstration of how the thermal () and drag () contributions to the strength combine through Eq. (5) to give . Curves are for the 300 K case shown in Fig. 3 (screw dislocations in tantalum at zero pressure).

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

(Color online) Molecular dynamics simulation results (points) and calibrated functional forms (smooth curves) for the mobility of screw dislocations in vanadium at zero pressure.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

(Color online) Molecular dynamics simulation results (points) and calibrated functional forms (smooth curves) for the mobility of screw dislocations in tantalum at zero pressure.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Saturation dislocation density as a function of plastic strain rate for tantalum from dislocation dynamics simulations and a power-law fit to the results.

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

(Color online) Model predictions for vanadium under isochoric uniaxial adiabatic deformation at 0.5 Mbar pressure and starting from 500 K.

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

(Color online) Illustration of multiscale strength dependence on temperature and strain rate in the context of quasistatic and comparatively low-rate dynamic experimental data.

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

(Color online) Predicted (a) effective plastic strain rate and (b) dislocation density evolution for the results in Fig. 8.

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

(Color online) Predicted stress relaxation in tantalum after uniaxial precompression of 2 and 4%.

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

Simulated average pressure at the target surface for laser driven Rayleigh–Taylor instability growth in tantalum based on shots at the Omega laser facility, Rochester, NY. See also Figs. 10 and 11.

Image of FIG. 10.
FIG. 10.

(Color) Spatial distribution of quantities in the tantalum for laser-driven Rayleigh–Taylor instability growth simulation at roughly 50 ns. The other materials in the simulation are not shown. Dislocation density is plotted with a logarithmic scale, and all quantities are plotted with a linear scale. See also Figs. 9 and 11.

Image of FIG. 11.
FIG. 11.

(Color online) Time histories of simulation results for laser-driven Rayleigh–Taylor instability growth in tantalum: (a) growth factor from various models and from the experiments, (b) plastic strain rate weighted average drag proportion. See also Figs. 9 and 10.

Image of FIG. 12.
FIG. 12.

(Color online) Results for growth factor in explosively driven Rayleigh–Taylor instability growth in tantalum based on shots at the pRad facility, Los Alamos, NM.

Image of FIG. 13.
FIG. 13.

(Color) Results for laser driven Rayleigh–Taylor instability growth in vanadium based on shots at the Omega laser facility, Rochester, NY: (a) growth factor from various models and from the experiments and (b) plastic strain rate weighted average drag proportion.

Tables

Generic image for table
Table I.

Material parameters.

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/content/aip/journal/jap/109/7/10.1063/1.3553718
2011-04-01
2014-04-18
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: A multiscale strength model for extreme loading conditions
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jap/109/7/10.1063/1.3553718
10.1063/1.3553718
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