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Effect of low-temperature baking on the radio-frequency properties of niobium superconducting cavities for particle accelerators
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10.1063/1.1767295
/content/aip/journal/jap/96/3/10.1063/1.1767295
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jap/96/3/10.1063/1.1767295

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

vs field “anomalous” behaviors.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Oxygen concentration relative to the surface as a function of temperature in kelvin at a depth of .

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Oxygen concentration relative to the surface as a function of time in hours at a depth of and at a temperature of .

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Schematic of the experimental setup.

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Typical frequency shift vs temperature close to at . Data are acquired every .

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Typical surface resistance vs temperature close to at .

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

Typical surface resistance vs temperature in the normal conducting state.

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

Variation of BCS surface resistance at as a function of baking temperature.

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

Variation of mean free path as a function of the baking temperature.

Image of FIG. 10.
FIG. 10.

Surface as a function of baking temperature.

Image of FIG. 11.
FIG. 11.

Partial pressure for the three main gases registered after baking for vs baking temperature.

Image of FIG. 12.
FIG. 12.

Hydrogen concentration vs depth for samples baked and not baked.

Image of FIG. 13.
FIG. 13.

vs before (solid symbols) and after , baking (open symbols) at three different temperatures: (squares), (diamonds), and (triangles).

Image of FIG. 14.
FIG. 14.

Surface resistance vs 1/temperature before and after , baking. The solid lines represent the results from the fit using the BCS surface resistance plus the residual term.

Image of FIG. 15.
FIG. 15.

Surface resistance vs temperature close to before and after , baking. The solid lines represent the results from the fit using the BCS surface resistance plus the residual term.

Image of FIG. 16.
FIG. 16.

Variation of penetration depth as a function of the reduced temperature parameter before and after , baking. The solid lines represent the results from the fit using the BCS theory.

Image of FIG. 17.
FIG. 17.

vs before (solid symbols) and after , baking (open symbols) at three different temperatures: (squares), (diamonds), and (triangles).

Image of FIG. 18.
FIG. 18.

Variation of penetration depth as a function of the reduced temperature parameter before and after , baking. The solid lines represent the results from the fit using the BCS theory.

Image of FIG. 19.
FIG. 19.

vs before (solid symbols) and after , baking (open symbols) at three different temperatures: (squares), (diamonds), and (triangles).

Image of FIG. 20.
FIG. 20.

Surface resistance vs at low field and ; data are fitted to function (2) before (solid symbols) and after baking (open symbols) at three different temperatures: (triangles), (circles), and (squares).

Image of FIG. 21.
FIG. 21.

Variation of surface resistance vs for the baseline data before baking. Fitted functions according to model 1 are indicated.

Image of FIG. 22.
FIG. 22.

vs in the high-field -drop region from three different tests at (solid symbols) and (open symbols) fitted with model 3 (solid lines).

Image of FIG. 23.
FIG. 23.

Electric surface resistance from three different tests at (solid symbols) and (open symbols) fitted with model 1 (solid lines).

Image of FIG. 24.
FIG. 24.

vs in the presence of (diamonds), (squares), and (circles) residual dc magnetic field. Solid symbols refer to data taken at , open symbols refer to data taken at .

Tables

Generic image for table
Table I.

Material parameters before and after baking at different temperatures which are obtained below at depth from the surface and between and for .

Generic image for table
Table II.

BCS surface resistance at , residual resistance and high-field limitations.

Generic image for table
Table III.

Average values of the fitting parameters a and b of the low-field -slope model represented by Eq. (2).

Generic image for table
Table IV.

Average correlation factors for the models describing the medium field slope at three different temperatures.

Generic image for table
Table V.

Average values of the slope for all the tests obtained from the data fit with model 1.

Generic image for table
Table VI.

Main fitting parameters and correlation factors for the surface resistance fit of the drop with models 1 and 3.

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/content/aip/journal/jap/96/3/10.1063/1.1767295
2004-07-26
2014-04-19
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Effect of low-temperature baking on the radio-frequency properties of niobium superconducting cavities for particle accelerators
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jap/96/3/10.1063/1.1767295
10.1063/1.1767295
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