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The influence of wavelength on phase transformations induced by picosecond and femtosecond laser pulses in thin films
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10.1063/1.2139830
/content/aip/journal/jap/98/11/10.1063/1.2139830
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jap/98/11/10.1063/1.2139830
View: Figures

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Dependence of the optical penetration depth (normal incidence) on the pump wavelength for the crystalline, liquid, and amorphous phases of bulk based on dielectric function data from Ref. 25.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Normalized streak camera reflectivity transients on crystalline induced by single pump pulses of wavelengths (a) 400 and and (b) 700 and (RTR setup with a probe pulse). Each arrow indicates the arrival time of the pump pulse to the surface. , , and denote the reflectivities corresponding to the crystalline, amorphous, and liquid phases.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Normalized reflectivity change on crystalline as a function of probe delay for irradiation by a single , pump pulse (ps-PP setup with , probe pulse). The vertical dashed line indicates the arrival of the pump pulse to the surface.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Normalized reflectivity change on (a) crystalline and (b) amorphous as a function of probe delay for irradiation by a single , pump pulse (fs-TRM setup with , probe pulse).

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Dependence of the -to- transformation time for a pump pulse duration of on the optical penetration depth normal to the surface of (a) the crystalline phase only and on (b) the mean of the crystalline and liquid phases. Open points denote fs-TRM measurements and closed points denote RTR measurements. The vertical dashed lines indicate the approximate threshold values for obtaining a fast transformation time in the subnanosecond range. The horizontal arrows on the data points show the effect of a reduced optical penetration depth into liquid.

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Normalized streak camera reflectivity transients on crystalline induced by single pump pulses of wavelengths (a) 400, (b) 600, and (c) where indicates the transformation time (RTR setup with probe pulse).

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

Normalized reflectivity change on (a) crystalline and (b) amorphous as a function of probe delay for irradiation by a single , pump pulse (fs-TRM setup with , probe pulse).

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

Dependence of the transformation time on the pump pulse optical penetration depth normal to the surface for a pulse duration of . Open points denote fs-TRM measurements and closed points denote RTR measurements.

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/content/aip/journal/jap/98/11/10.1063/1.2139830
2005-12-12
2014-04-24
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: The influence of wavelength on phase transformations induced by picosecond and femtosecond laser pulses in GeSb thin films
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jap/98/11/10.1063/1.2139830
10.1063/1.2139830
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