1887
banner image
No data available.
Please log in to see this content.
You have no subscription access to this content.
No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
Boundary slip and wetting properties of interfaces: Correlation of the contact angle with the slip length
Rent:
Rent this article for
USD
10.1063/1.2194019
/content/aip/journal/jcp/124/20/10.1063/1.2194019
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jcp/124/20/10.1063/1.2194019

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Initial configuration of argon atoms arranged in the center between two graphitic walls.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Example of a Gibbs dividing surface (dashed line) for the case of , , and . is at the center of the channel. The liquid phase occupies region of from . Below , it is the vapor phase.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Definition of the slip length in a planar Couette flow. The upper wall moves at , while the lower wall is fixed.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Intensity (gray scale) maps and density contours for contact angle simulations (from left to right: , 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4). and .

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

The density profile (left) and the gray scale map of density gradients (right) obtained from equilibrium molecular dynamics. (, , and ).

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Contact angle vs relative energy (left) and cosine of the contact angle vs (right). ( and ).

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

Slip length vs data for the planar Couette flow at , for different values of temperature.

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

Contact angle vs relative size at and .

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

Slip length vs data for the planar Couette flow at different values of (for and .)

Image of FIG. 10.
FIG. 10.

Slip length vs data for the planar Couette flow at , , and .

Image of FIG. 11.
FIG. 11.

Fluid molecules form epitaxial layers in proximity to the wall, mimicking the solid lattice structure (, , and ).

Image of FIG. 12.
FIG. 12.

Contact angle vs temperature data (at , , and ).

Image of FIG. 13.
FIG. 13.

Slip length (nm) as a function of wall velocity (m/s) at and (for , 100, and ). Points: simulation data. Line: trend line fit.

Image of FIG. 14.
FIG. 14.

Viscosity as a function of shear rate (wall speed) at different positions. There is scatter in the data. No shear thinning is observed at the wall.

Image of FIG. 15.
FIG. 15.

Contact angle vs slip length due to changes in the relative energy (at fixed , , and ).

Image of FIG. 16.
FIG. 16.

Contact angle vs slip length induced by changing (at fixed , , and ).

Tables

Generic image for table
Table I.

Overall summary of trends obtained in this study.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/aip/journal/jcp/124/20/10.1063/1.2194019
2006-05-22
2014-04-16
Loading

Full text loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Boundary slip and wetting properties of interfaces: Correlation of the contact angle with the slip length
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jcp/124/20/10.1063/1.2194019
10.1063/1.2194019
SEARCH_EXPAND_ITEM