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Time-resolved spectroscopy of silver nanocubes: Observation and assignment of coherently excited vibrational modes
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10.1063/1.2672907
/content/aip/journal/jcp/126/9/10.1063/1.2672907
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jcp/126/9/10.1063/1.2672907

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

SEM and TEM images (inserts) of the different nanocube samples used in these experiments. Panels A–F correspond to samples S1–S6. Note the different sizes of the scale bars in the images. The average edge lengths for each sample are collected in Table I.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

UV-vis absorption spectra of selected nanocube samples S1, S4, S5, and S6. The average edge lengths for the samples are 35, 54, 72, and , respectively.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

(Color) (a) Top: contour plot of the wavelength vs time response for sample S4. signal and signal. (b) Transient absorption trace at extracted from the data in (a). The solid lines show a fit to the data using two cosine terms and exponential decays for electron-phonon coupling and heat dissipation. The two cosine components extracted from the fit are shown above the experimental trace.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Transient absorption data for sample S6 recorded at . The solid line shows a fit to the data using two cosine terms and exponential decays to describe electron-phonon coupling and heat dissipation. The two cosine components extracted from the fit are shown below the experimental trace.

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Average period vs average edge length for all the samples examined. The solid lines are the calculated periods for the dominant modes excited by a uniform initial strain [ and ]. The dashed lines are the calculated periods for the dominant modes excited by a nonuniform initial strain [ and ]. The error bars indicate the standard deviation of the measurements.

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Fourier coefficients for the displacement and volume change associated with the mode vs normalized frequency for a uniform initial strain.

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

Mode shapes for the two dominant modes observed in Fig. 6. (a) Mode shape of the 17th eigenmode, which has a normalized eigenfrequency of . (b) Mode shape of the 42nd eigenmode, which has a normalized eigenfrequency of .

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

Fourier coefficients for the displacement and volume change associated with the mode vs normalized frequency for a nonuniform initial strain [as given by Eq. (7)].

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

Mode shapes for the two dominant modes observed in Fig. 8. (a) Mode shape of the fifth eigenmode, which has a normalized eigenfrequency of . (b) Mode shape of the eighth mode, which has a normalized eigenfrequency of . Both these modes are triply degenerate and only one component is shown.

Tables

Generic image for table
Table I.

Average values of the edge length and period for the different nanocube samples. The samples are arranged in order of increasing edge length. The errors represent the standard deviation. The number of particles counted in the TEM measurements for samples S1-S6 were 421, 271, 284, 415, 188, and 465.

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/content/aip/journal/jcp/126/9/10.1063/1.2672907
2007-03-07
2014-04-25
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Time-resolved spectroscopy of silver nanocubes: Observation and assignment of coherently excited vibrational modes
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jcp/126/9/10.1063/1.2672907
10.1063/1.2672907
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