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State-resolved reactivity of on : The role of surface orientation and impact site
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10.1063/1.3328885
/content/aip/journal/jcp/132/9/10.1063/1.3328885
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jcp/132/9/10.1063/1.3328885
View: Figures

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

surface model, illustrating the two azimuthal orientations used for reactivity measurements. For parallel incidence , the incident methane impinges on the surface along the direction, parallel to the direction of the missing rows. For perpendicular incidence , is incident along the [001] direction, perpendicular to the missing rows and to the main surface corrugation. The first, second, and third layer atoms are differentiated from bulk with green, blue, and red colors, respectively.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Laser-off reactivity, , for on , at and 600 K, as function of translational energy at normal incidence : (◼,◻) , pure and mixtures, ; (▼) mixture, . The solid and dashed lines are S-shaped curves fitted to the data points.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

State-resolved reactivities and for on as a function of incident translational energy (normal incidence, ) for .

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Comparison of translational energy scaling models: (●) and (▲) measured for normal incidence. (Other symbols) State-resolved reactivities measured for off-normal incidence as a function of (local) normal energy calculated by different models. To ease comparison of different scaling models, we use a normalized translational energy scale (see text).

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

and for on at fixed incident translational energy as a function of polar angle for incidence parallel and perpendicular to the missing row direction.

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Relative area, calculated in the 3D shadowing model, of the first three Pt layers on exposed to the molecular beam as a function of polar angle for incidence parallel and perpendicular to the missing row direction.

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

Reactivity ratio for and as a function of polar angle of incidence , compared to predictions of the 3D shadowing model assuming reaction only on the first layer ridge atoms.

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

reactivity enhancement as a function of polar angle for incidence perpendicular and parallel to the missing row directions.

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

Laser-off reactivity for on (open squares) and Pt(111) (closed circles) as a function of incident translational energy (normal incidence) for . S-shaped curves are fitted to the data to extract a difference in average barrier height of .

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/content/aip/journal/jcp/132/9/10.1063/1.3328885
2010-03-02
2014-04-25
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: State-resolved reactivity of CH4 on Pt(110)-(1×2): The role of surface orientation and impact site
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jcp/132/9/10.1063/1.3328885
10.1063/1.3328885
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