1887
banner image
No data available.
Please log in to see this content.
You have no subscription access to this content.
No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
Electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering of nitric oxide: Saturation and Stark effects
Rent:
Rent this article for
USD
10.1063/1.3474702
/content/aip/journal/jcp/133/8/10.1063/1.3474702
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jcp/133/8/10.1063/1.3474702
View: Figures

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Schematic diagram of the energy level structure for the ERE-CARS calculations for the transition in the fundamental (1,0) Raman band of the nitric oxide molecule.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Comparison of Stark broadening for two-photon absorption and for ERE-CARS of NO.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Experimental system for the narrowband scanning ERE-CARS process of NO.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Comparison between density-matrix calculations and experimental ERE-CARS spectra generated for a pressure of 1.0 atm, a concentration of 100 ppm NO, and for Raman shifts and Raman transitions of (a) , , (b) , , (c) , , and (d) , . Stark shifting was not included in these calculations.

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Comparison between density-matrix calculations and experimental ERE-CARS spectra generated for a pressure of 1.0 atm, a concentration of 100 ppm NO, and a Raman shift range of . The probe laser frequencies were fixed at and , respectively. Stark shifting was not included in these calculations.

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Measured NO ERE-CARS spectra at various pump, Stokes, and probe energy levels. The probe laser frequency was scanned from to . The Raman shift was fixed at . The Raman shift corresponding to Raman transition of is . The pulse energy levels for the pump, Stokes, and probe laser are (in unit of mJ) (a) 1, 1, 0.05; (b) 2, 2, 0.05; (c) 10, 10, 0.05; (d) 2, 2, 1.5. The peak laser irradiances shown in the figure are calculated using beam diameters of for the pump and Stokes beams and for the probe beam. A pulse duration of 7 ns is used.

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

Calculated NO ERE-CARS spectra at various pump, Stokes, and probe laser irradiances. The probe laser frequency was scanned from to . The Raman shift was fixed at . The Raman shift corresponding to Raman transition of is .

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

Calculated NO ERE-CARS spectra with and without the Stark shifting. The peak irradiances were for the pump and Stokes beams and for the probe beam. The probe laser frequency was scanned from to . The Raman shift was fixed at . The Raman shift corresponding to Raman transition of is .

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

Temporal dependence of the populations of levels G, E, and S for different pump and Stokes irradiances. is the initial population of level G prior to laser irradiance. The ERE-CARS transition is , . The peak probe laser irradiance is . The collisional dephasing rate for the Raman transition is , corresponding to a Raman linewidth of , the collisional dephasing rate for the electronic transition is , corresponding to an electronic transition linewidth of . The VET and electronic quenching rate constants are set to . The laser irradiances peak at 7.5 ns.

Image of FIG. 10.
FIG. 10.

Temporal dependence of the real and imaginary components of the induced Raman coherence, the magnitude of the induced Raman coherence, and the ERE-CARS signal for the , ERE-CARS transition. The coherence matrix elements are normalized by dividing by the population of level G prior to laser excitation. The peak laser irradiances for the pump, Stokes, and probe pulses are indicated in the figure. The collisional parameters are the same as listed in the caption for Fig. 9.

Image of FIG. 11.
FIG. 11.

Temporal dependence of the CARS signal for different pump and Stokes irradiances. The ERE-CARS transition is , . The peak probe laser irradiance is . The collisional parameters are the same as listed in the caption for Fig. 9.

Image of FIG. 12.
FIG. 12.

Temporal dependence of the populations of levels G, E, and S, normalized by the population of level G prior to laser irradiation. The calculations are performed for the , ERE-CARS transition. The peak pump and Stokes laser irradiances are . The collisional parameters are the same as listed in the caption for Fig. 9.

Image of FIG. 13.
FIG. 13.

Temporal dependence of the real and imaginary components of the Raman coherence for different peak probe irradiances. The peak pump and Stokes laser irradiances are . The collisional parameters are the same as listed in the caption for Fig. 9.

Image of FIG. 14.
FIG. 14.

Temporal dependence of the CARS signal for different pump and Stokes irradiances. The ERE-CARS transition is , . The peak pump and Stokes laser irradiances are . The collisional parameters are the same as listed in the caption for Fig. 9.

Image of FIG. 15.
FIG. 15.

Temporal dependence of the populations of levels G, E, and S, normalized by the population of level G prior to laser irradiation. The calculations are performed for the , ERE-CARS transition. The peak pump and Stokes laser irradiances are . The peak probe irradiances are (a) and (b) . The collisional parameters are the same as listed in the caption for Fig. 9.

Image of FIG. 16.
FIG. 16.

Temporal dependence of the real and imaginary components of the Raman coherence for different peak probe irradiances. The peak pump and Stokes laser irradiances are (a) and (b) . The collisional parameters are the same as listed in the caption for Fig. 9.

Image of FIG. 17.
FIG. 17.

Temporal dependence of the CARS signal for different probe irradiances. The ERE-CARS transition is , . The peak pump and Stokes laser irradiances are (a) and (b) . The collisional parameters are the same as listed in the caption for Fig. 9.

Image of FIG. 18.
FIG. 18.

Calculated ERE-CARS signal as a function of at three different values of . The ERE-CARS transition is .

Image of FIG. 19.
FIG. 19.

Calculated ERE-CARS signal as a function of at three . The ERE-CARS transition is . Trends are similar to those observed in Fig. 18.

Image of FIG. 20.
FIG. 20.

Calculated integrated ERE-CARS signal as a function of the collisional dephasing rate and at two different pump and Stokes laser irradiances , . The peak probe laser irradiance was set at . and were set the same in the DNI calculations. The integrated ERE-CARS signals at each were normalized with the integrated ERE-CARS signal at .

Image of FIG. 21.
FIG. 21.

Calculated integrated ERE-CARS signal as a function of the collisional dephasing rate at two different pump and Stokes laser irradiances , . The probe laser irradiance was set at . The integrated ERE-CARS signals at each were normalized with respect to the integrated ERE-CARS signal at .

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/aip/journal/jcp/133/8/10.1063/1.3474702
2010-08-31
2014-04-20
Loading

Full text loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering of nitric oxide: Saturation and Stark effects
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jcp/133/8/10.1063/1.3474702
10.1063/1.3474702
SEARCH_EXPAND_ITEM