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Equation of state and jamming density for equivalent bi- and polydisperse, smooth, hard sphere systems
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10.1063/1.3694030
/content/aip/journal/jcp/136/12/10.1063/1.3694030
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jcp/136/12/10.1063/1.3694030

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

The quality factor, i.e., the numerical Z scaled by the theoretical predictions for different densities and for different size distributions (a) monodisperse, and polydisperse with (b) uniform size, ω = 5, (c) uniform size, ω = 100, and (d) uniform volume, ω = 4. The growth rate for all data is Γ = 16 × 10−6. The error bars indicate the standard deviation of the quality factor within an averaging bin. The error bars are shown only for the BMCSL EOS since in the other cases they have the same trend and magnitude.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

The estimated jamming density ϕ J as a function of volume fraction ν for systems with uniform size distribution. Shown are systems of 4096 spheres with various size ratios ω. In (a) ω, given in the inset, corresponds to decreasing ϕ J (top-to-bottom) and in (b) increasing ω corresponds to bottom-to-top. Also plotted are the fluid theory (BMCSL EOS) and the approximation for the crystal phase.67 The used growth rate here is Γ = 8 × 10−6. For ω = 1.2 data for two different runs are shown, marked with 1.2 and 1.2*.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

The estimated jamming density ϕ J as a function of volume fraction ν for bidisperse systems corresponding to uniform size distribution. Increasing ω corresponds to bottom-to-top, with growth rate Γ = 16 × 10−6. The (metastable) freezing density is decreasing with increasing size ratio. The BMCSL EOS are shown by dashed-dotted lines.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Particle systems with uniform size distribution with different size ratios at densities very close to jamming. Size ratios are ω = 1 (a), ω = 1.12 (b), ω = 1.18 (c), and ω = 1.22 (d). The order-disorder transition can be clearly seen as the size ratio increases. Color is by relative size, i.e., yellow (light) corresponds to small particles and blue (dark) corresponds to big ones. The used growth rate to reach these configurations was Γ = 8 × 10−6.

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Particle systems with bidisperse size distribution corresponding to a uniform size distribution, i.e., n 1 = 1/2, with different size ratios at densities very close to jamming. Size ratios are R bi ≈ 1.100 (ω = 1.18) (a), R bi ≈ 1.111 (ω = 1.2) (b), R bi ≈ 2.060 (ω = 4) (c), and R bi ≈ 2.404 (ω = 6) (d). The order-disorder transition can be clearly seen. Note that in (d) also some signs of segregation/clusterization of small particles can be seen, though investigation of this is beyond the scope of this paper.

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

The estimated jamming density ϕ J as a function of volume fraction ν for systems with (a) uniform size distribution and their bidisperse equivalents, using Γ = 8 × 10−6, and for systems with (b) uniform volume distribution and their bidisperse equivalents, using Γ = 16 × 10−6. Size ratios ω and R bi are displayed in the inset, where the latter is given in brackets. Also plotted are the fluid theory (BMCSL EOS) and the approximation for the crystal phase.67 Data for polydisperse systems in (b) are shown for ω ⩽ 4. In the inset of (b) the zoomed data for ω = 8 are shown.

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

The maximum density νmax as a function of the inverse size ratio ω−1 for different size distributions and for different compression rates, in the inset subscript 1 corresponds to the reference growth rate Γ = 8 × 10−6 and subscript 2 corresponds to Γ = 16 × 10−6, i.e., two times faster. Size distributions are (a) uniform size distribution (US) and their bidisperse equivalents (BUS) or (b) uniform volume (UV) and their bidisperse equivalents (BUV). The size ratio ω corresponds to the polydisperse systems, while bidisperse ones are constructed using C. Results for BUV systems with N = 8192, using Γ = 16 × 10−5, are shown as pluses in (b), which are fitted for ω ⩾ 10 by Eq. (16) with swapped values of ϕRCP and (dash-dotted line). The left most point (+, ω = 30) is higher than expected because of partial crystallization, setting in also here at very large ω. Results from Ref. 83 obtained by compression of soft frictionless particles with a uniform size distribution are shown as crosses in (a). In the inset of (a), νmax is plotted for different growth rates Γ for the uniform size distribution (ω = 2) and their bidisperse equivalent (R bi ≈ 1.48). In the inset of (b), the deviation of data from the fits is shown with corresponding symbols.

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

The compressibility factor scaled by the free volume equation of state (14) in the limit of diverging pressure for systems with uniform size distribution for different size ratios, increasing ω corresponds to top-to-bottom, with growth rate Γ = 16 × 10−6. When partial crystallization happens we see some fine structures as shown in the inset for the monodisperse system (ω = 1).

Tables

Generic image for table
Table I.

Given are size ratios ω and dimensionless moments O 1 and O 2 for a few polydisperse systems with uniform size (US) and uniform volume (UV) radii distributions and R bi with for their bidisperse equivalents.

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/content/aip/journal/jcp/136/12/10.1063/1.3694030
2012-03-28
2014-04-20
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Equation of state and jamming density for equivalent bi- and polydisperse, smooth, hard sphere systems
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/jcp/136/12/10.1063/1.3694030
10.1063/1.3694030
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