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de Haas–van Alphen effect and Fermi surface properties in rare earth and actinide compounds (Review Article)
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10.1063/1.3683408
/content/aip/journal/ltp/38/2/10.1063/1.3683408
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/ltp/38/2/10.1063/1.3683408

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Doniach phase diagram (a) and the γ vs lattice constant in UX3, cited from Ref. 3 (b).

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility in the typical cerium and uranium compounds, cited from Ref. 3.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Schematic view of the superconducting order parameter with s-wave, d-wave and p-wave pairing, cited from Ref. 3.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Wigner–Seitz radius of the actinide, lanthanide and transition metals, cited from Ref. 20.

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Photograph of CeCu6 ingot grown by the Czochralski method in the rf furnace with a working coil (a), CeRu2 ingot grown in a tetra-arc furnace (b), single crystal ingots of UPt3, CeRu2 and CeIrSi3 obtained by the Czochralski method (c), NpRhGa5 grown by the flux method in the alumina crucible (d), CePt3Si grown by the Bridgman method in the Mo-crucible (e), U3As4 and UAs2 grown by the chemical transport method (f), and a UPt3 ingot which was annealed under high vacuum of 10−10 Torr via the solid state electrotransport method (g).

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Binary phase diagrams of CeRu2 (a) and USi3 (b), cited from Ref. 22.

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

Cubic crystal structure (a), lattice constant (b), cited from Ref. 32, and the Néel temperature TN in RIn3, where a solid line indicates the de Gennes scaling (c).

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

Angular dependence of the dHvA frequency in LaIn3, cited from Ref. 39. The solid lines are the results of band calculations.40

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

Band 6-hole (a) and band 7-electron Fermi surfaces (b) in LaIn3, cited from Refs. 39 and 40.

Image of FIG. 10.
FIG. 10.

Antiferromagnetic structure in NdIn3, cited from Ref. 43. Four chemical unit cells are shown, where one magnetic unit cell is represented by thick solid lines with arrows indicating the directions of the magnetic moments.

Image of FIG. 11.
FIG. 11.

Magnetization curve and the dHvA oscillation for H||〈100〉 in NdIn3, cited from Refs. 41, 42, and 44.

Image of FIG. 12.
FIG. 12.

Field dependence of the dHvA frequency in NdIn3, cited from Refs. 41 and 42.

Image of FIG. 13.
FIG. 13.

Angular dependence of the dHvA amplitude for branch a in NdIn3, cited from Refs. 41 and 42.

Image of FIG. 14.
FIG. 14.

Fermi surfaces in the paramagnetic state (a) and the antiferromagnetic state (b) in NdIn3, cited from Refs. 41 and 42.

Image of FIG. 15.
FIG. 15.

Crystal and magnetic structure in CeIn3 (a), the corresponding magnetic Brillouin zone of CeIn3 and a band 7-electron Fermi surface (b), and Fermi surfaces named d in LaIn3 and LuIn3 (CeIn3) (c), cited from Refs. 38 and 49.

Image of FIG. 16.
FIG. 16.

Angular dependence of the cyclotron mass of the branch d (a) and the corresponding dHvA amplitude for the fundamental, 2nd and 3rd harmonics in the field range of 70 to 90 kOe at 0.45 K in CeIn3, cited from Ref. 51 (b).

Image of FIG. 17.
FIG. 17.

Angular dependence of the dHvA frequency in a Pauli paramagnet YbIn3. The solid lines are the results of energy band calculation, cited from Ref. 49.

Image of FIG. 18.
FIG. 18.

Theoretical Fermi surfaces in a Pauli paramagnet YbIn3, cited from Ref. 49.

Image of FIG. 19.
FIG. 19.

Angular dependence of the dHvA frequency in YbAl3.56

Image of FIG. 20.
FIG. 20.

Angular dependence of the dHvA frequency (a) and the corresponding Fermi surfaces based on the conventional band model (b); the angular dependence of the dHvA frequency (c) and the corresponding modified Fermi surfaces in YbAl3 (d), cited from Ref. 56.

Image of FIG. 21.
FIG. 21.

Angular dependence of the dHvA frequency in RIn3 (R = La,39 Ce,45 Pr,46 Nd,41 Sm,47 Gd,48 Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb,49 and Lu (Ref. 49)). Solid lines in LaIn3 are the results of energy band calculations,40 while the other solid lines connecting the data are guide lines.

Image of FIG. 22.
FIG. 22.

Angular dependence of the dHvA frequency in a Pauli paramagnet YbPb3, cited from Ref. 61.

Image of FIG. 23.
FIG. 23.

Fermi surfaces in a Pauli paramagnet YbPb3, cited from Ref. 61.

Image of FIG. 24.
FIG. 24.

Angular dependence of the dHvA frequency in a non-4f reference compound LaSn3 (a) and a 4f-itinerant CeSn3 (b), cited from Refs. 62, 67, 72, and 73. Solid lines are the results of energy band calculation.

Image of FIG. 25.
FIG. 25.

Fermi surface of LaSn3 (a) and CeSn3 (b), cited from Refs. 72 and 73.

Image of FIG. 26.
FIG. 26.

Angle dependence of the dHvA frequency in LaPb3 (a) and the theoretical one (b), cited from Ref. 63.

Image of FIG. 27.
FIG. 27.

Fermi surfaces in LaPb3, cited from Ref. 63.

Image of FIG. 28.
FIG. 28.

Temperature dependence of the cyclotron mass in PrPb3, cited from Ref. 63.

Image of FIG. 29.
FIG. 29.

Temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility in USn3, UAl3, and NpGe3, cited from Ref. 74.

Image of FIG. 30.
FIG. 30.

Angular dependence of the dHvA frequency in a heavy fermion compound UAl3 (a) and the theoretical one (b), cited from Ref. 64.

Image of FIG. 31.
FIG. 31.

Theoretical 5f-itinerant band 8-hole Fermi surfaces in UAl3, cited from Ref. 64.

Image of FIG. 32.
FIG. 32.

Angular dependence of the dHvA frequency in an antiferromagnet UGa3, cited from Ref. 65.

Image of FIG. 33.
FIG. 33.

Angular dependence of the dHvA frequency in an antiferromagnet UIn3, cited from Ref. 66.

Image of FIG. 34.
FIG. 34.

Angular dependence of the dHvA frequency in a Pauli paramagnet USi3 (a) and the theoretical one (b), cited from Ref. 69.

Image of FIG. 35.
FIG. 35.

Theoretical 5f-itinerant Fermi surfaces in USi3, cited from Ref. 69.

Image of FIG. 36.
FIG. 36.

Angular dependence of the dHvA frequency in a spin-fluctuation compound USn3.

Image of FIG. 37.
FIG. 37.

Angular dependence of the dHvA frequency in a heavy fermion compound NpGe3 (a) and the theoretical one (b), cited from Ref. 71.

Image of FIG. 38.
FIG. 38.

Theoretical 5f-itinerant Fermi surfaces and cross-sections in NpGe3. The color presents the contribution of 5f-electrons, cited from Ref. 71.

Image of FIG. 39.
FIG. 39.

Magnetic phase diagram in an antiferromagnet NpIn3, cited from Ref. 58.

Image of FIG. 40.
FIG. 40.

Angular dependence of the dHvA frequency in an antiferromagnet NpIn3, cited from Ref. 58.

Image of FIG. 41.
FIG. 41.

Proposed Fermi surfaces in the field-induced ferromagnetic state of NpIn3, cited from Ref. 58.

Image of FIG. 42.
FIG. 42.

dHvA oscillations (a) and the corresponding FFT spectra in a paramagnet PuIn3 (b), cited from Ref. 68.

Image of FIG. 43.
FIG. 43.

Angular dependence of the dHvA frequency in a paramagnet PuIn3. Solid lines are the results of 5f-itinerant energy band calculation, cited from Ref. 68.

Image of FIG. 44.
FIG. 44.

Theoretical 5f-itinerant Fermi surfaces in PuIn3, cited from Ref. 68. The color presents the contribution of 5f-electrons.

Image of FIG. 45.
FIG. 45.

The tetragonal crystal structure in RTX5 and AnTX5.

Image of FIG. 46.
FIG. 46.

Angular dependence of the dHvA frequency (a) and the theoretical one (b) in a non-4f reference compound LaRhIn5.77

Image of FIG. 47.
FIG. 47.

Theoretical Fermi surfaces of LaRhIn5 (a)–(c), CeCoIn5 (d)–(f) and ThRhIn5 (g)–(i), cited from Refs. 77 and 80.

Image of FIG. 48.
FIG. 48.

Pressure phase diagram in CeRhIn5 (a) and CeCoIn5 (b), cited from Refs. 87–89.

Image of FIG. 49.
FIG. 49.

Temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity in CeRhIn5 under pressure (a), (b); in CeCoIn5, PuCoGa5, and NpPd5Al2 (c), (d). Only PuCoGa5 is a polycrystal sample, and the scale is shown by the right hand in (c), cited from Ref. 90.

Image of FIG. 50.
FIG. 50.

Angular dependence of the dHvA frequency of a non-magnetic heavy fermion superconductor CeCoIn5 (a), a Pauli paramagnet ThRhIn5 (b) and a non-4f reference compound LaRhIn5 (c), cited from Ref. 80.

Image of FIG. 51.
FIG. 51.

Field dependence of the electronic specific heat Ce /T (a) and cyclotron mass in CeCoIn5 (b), cited from Ref. 82.

Image of FIG. 52.
FIG. 52.

Schematic pictures of the two dimensional superconducting gap with an isotropic gap (a) and a line node gap (b), cited from Ref. 21.

Image of FIG. 53.
FIG. 53.

Magnetization curves of CeCoIn5 (Ref. 100) (a) and NpPd5Al2 (Ref. 96) (b), revealing a step-like increase of the magnetization at Hc 2.

Image of FIG. 54.
FIG. 54.

Temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility in CeCoIn5 (Ref. 77) (a), PuRhGa5 (Ref. 95) (b) and NpPd5Al2 (Ref. 96) (c).

Image of FIG. 55.
FIG. 55.

Temperature dependence of the electronic specific heat in the form of Ce /T in CeCoIn5, cited from Ref. 102.

Image of FIG. 56.
FIG. 56.

Temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility in UTGa5 (T: transition metal), cited from Ref. 21.

Image of FIG. 57.
FIG. 57.

Experimental angular dependence of the dHvA frequency (a) and the theoretical one (b) in a Pauli paramagnet UFeGa5, cited from Ref. 81.

Image of FIG. 58.
FIG. 58.

Theoretical band 15-electron-Fermi surfaces based on a 4f-itinerant band model in a Pauli paramagnet UFeGa5, cited from Ref. 81.

Image of FIG. 59.
FIG. 59.

Angular dependence of the dHvA frequency in a Pauli paramagnet UCoGa5, cited from Ref. 82.

Image of FIG. 60.
FIG. 60.

Proposed Fermi surfaces in a Pauli paramagnet UCoGa5, cited from Ref. 82.

Image of FIG. 61.
FIG. 61.

Temperature dependence of the inverse magnetic susceptibility in UPtGa5. A solid line corresponds to the free ion value of 5f 2 and 5f 3 configurations, cited from Ref. 74.

Image of FIG. 62.
FIG. 62.

Antiferromagnetic structure of UPtGa5, cited from Ref. 103.

Image of FIG. 63.
FIG. 63.

Angular dependence of the dHvA frequency (a) and the theoretical one based on the spin (orbital)-polarized 5f-itinerant band model in an antiferromagnet UPtGa5, cited from Ref. 83 (b).

Image of FIG. 64.
FIG. 64.

Theoretical Fermi surfaces based in an antiferromagnet UPtGa5, cited from Ref. 83.

Image of FIG. 65.
FIG. 65.

Angular dependence of the dHvA frequency in an antiferromagnet NpRhGa5, cited from Ref. 84.

Image of FIG. 66.
FIG. 66.

Magnetic phase diagram for H||[001] in NpRhGa5, cited from Ref.105.

Image of FIG. 67.
FIG. 67.

Temperature dependence of the upper critical field in CeRhIn5 (Ref. 94) (a), CeCoIn5 (Ref. 79) (b), PuRhGa5 (Ref. 95) (c) and NpPd5Al2 (Ref. 96) (d). Thick solid lines in CeCoIn5 indicate the first-order phase transition at Hc 2, and the dark-gray regions in the mixed state might be the FFLO state, cited from Refs. 97 and 98.

Image of FIG. 68.
FIG. 68.

Theoretical Fermi surfaces based on the f-itinerant band model in PuCoGa5 (Ref. 85) (a), CeCoIn5 (Ref. 78) (b) and NpPd5Al2 (Ref. 108) (c).

Image of FIG. 69.
FIG. 69.

Crystal structure of actinide superconductors NpPd5Al2 (a) and PuCoGa5 (b), cited from Ref. 21.

Image of FIG. 70.
FIG. 70.

Crystal structure of CeRu2Si2.

Image of FIG. 71.
FIG. 71.

Magnetization curve of CeRu2Si2, cited from Refs. 109 and 110. The insert shows the temperature dependence of Δχ−1 defined in the text.

Image of FIG. 72.
FIG. 72.

dHvA oscillation (a) and the corresponding FFT spectrum of CeRu2Si2 for the field along [100] (b).

Image of FIG. 73.
FIG. 73.

Angular dependence of the dHvA frequency below Hc (a) and the result of the 4f-itinerant band calculations of CeRu2Si2 (b), cited from Refs. 113 and 114.

Image of FIG. 74.
FIG. 74.

Theoretical Fermi surface of CeRu2Si2 below Hc , cited from Ref. 114.

Image of FIG. 75.
FIG. 75.

Field dependence of the dHvA frequency (a) and cyclotron mass (b) for H||[001] in CeRu2Si2, cited from Ref. 113.

Image of FIG. 76.
FIG. 76.

Angular dependence of experimental dHvA results above Hc for CeRu2Si2 (a) and the band calculation results of LaRu2Si2 (b), cited from Refs. 113 and 115.

Image of FIG. 77.
FIG. 77.

Theoretical Fermi surface of LaRu2Si2, cited from Ref. 115.

Image of FIG. 78.
FIG. 78.

Temperature dependence of metamagnetic field (a) and phase diagram of CeRu2Si2, which was determined from the specific heat (shown by circles) and from the thermal expansion coefficient (shown by squares and triangles) (b), cited from Refs. 109, 110, 116, and 117.

Image of FIG. 79.
FIG. 79.

Magnetic field dependence of the specific heat in CeRu2Si2, cited from Ref. 116.

Image of FIG. 80.
FIG. 80.

Angular dependence of the dHvA frequency in UPt3, cited from Ref. 125. Theoretical results are shown by solid lines.

Image of FIG. 81.
FIG. 81.

Fermi surfaces in UPt3, cited from Ref. 125.

Image of FIG. 82.
FIG. 82.

High-field magnetization in UPt3, cited from Ref. 126.

Image of FIG. 83.
FIG. 83.

Field dependence of the cyclotron mass and the γ value in UPt3.126 The result of the γ value was cited from Ref. 127.

Image of FIG. 84.
FIG. 84.

Doniach phase diagram.

Image of FIG. 85.
FIG. 85.

Linear thermal expansions Δ/ along [001] and [100] in YbCu2Si2 (a) and YbCu2Ge2 (b), cited from Ref. 57, and along 〈100〉 of YbIr2Zn20 (c), cited from Ref. 131. The inset in shows enlarged scales of the experimental data of YbIr2Zn20 at low temperatures (c). The broken line in the inset is the lattice contribution calculated on the basis of the Grüneisen relation using the specific heat data of YIr2Zn20.

Image of FIG. 86.
FIG. 86.

Crystal strucutre of YbIr2Zn20, where Yb atoms form the diamond structure (a). Caged structure in YbIr2Zn20 (b).

Image of FIG. 87.
FIG. 87.

Temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility in YbCo2Zn20, YbRh2Zn20, and YbIr2Zn20 for H||〈100〉, and in YbCu2Si2 for H||[100]. The data above 2 K were measured by SQUID magnetometer, and the data below 1 K for YbCo2Zn20 were obtained by the ac-susceptibility measurement, cited from Ref. 123.

Image of FIG. 88.
FIG. 88.

Magnetization curves at 1.3 K in YbT2Zn20 (T: Co, Rh, Ir). Inset shows the field dependence of the ac-susceptibility at 60 mK in YbCo2Zn20, cited from Ref. 123.

Image of FIG. 89.
FIG. 89.

Temperature dependence of the metamagnetic field (a) and phase diagram of YbCo2Zn20 which was determined from the specific heat (shown by triangles) (b), cited from Ref. 134.

Image of FIG. 90.
FIG. 90.

Relation between T χmax and Hm in several Ce, Yb, and U compounds. The solid line represent the relation of Hm (kOe) = 15T χmax (K), cited from Ref. 123.

Image of FIG. 91.
FIG. 91.

Magnetic field dependences of the dHvA frequency of branch β (a), the corresponding cyclotron mass (b), and for H||〈100〉 in YbIr2Zn20 (c), cited from Ref. 131.

Image of FIG. 92.
FIG. 92.

Transverse magnetoresistance in the pressure region from ambient pressure to 3.4 GPa (a) and from 4.1 to 5.5 GPa in YbIr2Zn20 (b), cited from Ref. 135. Arrows indicate the metamagnetic transition.

Image of FIG. 93.
FIG. 93.

Pressure dependence of Hm (a) and A values (b) in YbIr2Zn20, cited from Ref. 135. Solid lines connecting the data are guides for the eyes.

Image of FIG. 94.
FIG. 94.

Generalized Kadowaki–Woods relation in Ce, Yb, U and the other compounds.

Image of FIG. 95.
FIG. 95.

Field dependence of the A value under several pressures (0–5.5 GPa) (a), and the values under 0 and 5.0 GPa (b), shown by circles, and cyclotron effective mass at 0 GPa, shown by open squares in YbIr2Zn20, cited from Ref. 135.

Image of FIG. 96.
FIG. 96.

FFT spectrum for H||〈100〉 in YbCo2Zn20, cited from Ref. 134.

Image of FIG. 97.
FIG. 97.

Magnetic field dependence of the value for J||H||〈100〉, shown by squares, together with the field dependence of the cyclotron effective mass , shown by closed circles for H||〈100〉 in YbCo2Zn20, for F, Oe: 3.15·107 (a), 1.15·107 (b), and 0.45·107 (c), cited from Ref. 123. Solid lines connecting the data are guide lines.

Image of FIG. 98.
FIG. 98.

Schematic view of the quadrupole moments.

Image of FIG. 99.
FIG. 99.

Crystal structure with two unit cells (a), quadrupole moment (b) and local distortion ɛv of PrCu2 (c).

Image of FIG. 100.
FIG. 100.

Magnetization curves of PrCu2. Thick lines, open circles and dotted lines show the pulse-field experimental curves, SQUID magnetometer data and CEF calculated curves, respectively, cited from Ref. 143.

Image of FIG. 101.
FIG. 101.

Magnetization curves of PrCu2. Thick lines and dotted lines show the experimental and CEF calculated curves, respectively, cited from Ref. 143.

Image of FIG. 102.
FIG. 102.

Magnetostriction along the a (a) and c (b) axes of PrCu2, cited from Ref. 141.

Image of FIG. 103.
FIG. 103.

dHvA oscillations of PrCu2, cited from Ref. 142. Note that the magnetic field in the left-hand side is larger than that in the right-hand side.

Image of FIG. 104.
FIG. 104.

Calculated (a) and experimental (b) magnetization curves of PrCu2, cited from Ref. 141.

Image of FIG. 105.
FIG. 105.

Field dependence of the calculated quadrupole moment in PrCu2, cited from Ref. 141.

Image of FIG. 106.
FIG. 106.

Magnetic structures of the q 1 -structure in the temperature range from TN  = 36 K to TN  = 25 K (a) and the 4q-structure below (b) in CeRh2Si2, cited from Ref. 147.

Image of FIG. 107.
FIG. 107.

Temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility (a) and the magnetic phase diagram (b) in CeRh2Si2, cited from Ref. 148.

Image of FIG. 108.
FIG. 108.

Pressure dependence of TN , , and Tsc , shown by open circles, open squares and closed circles, respectively, in CeRh2Si2. Tsc is enlarged by ten times compared with TN and . The ordered moment μ s is shown by triangles. The data on and μ s are cited from Ref. 147.

Image of FIG. 109.
FIG. 109.

Quadratic temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity in CeRh2Si2 under various pressures, cited from Ref. 149.

Image of FIG. 110.
FIG. 110.

Pressure dependence of A (a) and ρ0 (b) in CeRh2Si2, cited from Ref. 149.

Image of FIG. 111.
FIG. 111.

Low-temperature resistivity under pressure in CeRh2Si2, cited from Ref. 149.

Image of FIG. 112.
FIG. 112.

Temperature dependence of Hc 2 at 1.06 GPa in CeRh2Si2, cited from Ref. 149.

Image of FIG. 113.
FIG. 113.

dHvA oscillation (a) and its FFT spectrum at ambient pressure (b), dHvA oscillation (c) and its FFT spectrum at 1.29 GPa (d) in CeRh2Si2, cited from Refs. 154 and 155.

Image of FIG. 114.
FIG. 114.

Theoretical Fermi surfaces in LaRh2Si2 (a) and 4f-itinerant CeRh2Si2 (b), cited from Refs. 154 and 155.

Image of FIG. 115.
FIG. 115.

Pressure dependence of the dHvA frequency (a) and the cyclotron effective mass (b) in CeRh2Si2, cited from Refs. 154 and 155.

Image of FIG. 116.
FIG. 116.

Phase diagram for the Néel temperature TN and the superconducting transition temperature Tsc in CeIn3, cited from Ref. 38.

Image of FIG. 117.
FIG. 117.

Fermi surfaces of LaIn3, LuIn3, and 4f-itinerant CeIn3, cited from Ref. 38. The vacant space centered at Γ in the band 13-hole Fermi surface of LuIn3, shown in (c), corresponds to the closed band 13-electron Fermi surface shown in (c′).

Image of FIG. 118.
FIG. 118.

Pressure dependence of the dHvA frequency and its cyclotron effective mass in CeIn3 for the magnetic field along the principal axes H||〈100〉, 〈110〉, and 〈111〉, cited from Ref. 38. Open circles, triangles, and squares indicate branches d, d′, and a, respectively. A new branch indicated by reverse triangles appears at 2.86 and 2.90 GPa for H||〈100〉 and at 2.60 GPa for H||〈110〉.

Image of FIG. 119.
FIG. 119.

Magnetic phase diagram for the paramagnetic (Para) and antiferromagnetic (AF) phases at 2.20 and 2.56 GPa for H||〈111〉 in CeIn3, cited from Ref. 38.

Image of FIG. 120.
FIG. 120.

Angular dependence of the dHvA frequency in CeIn3 at 2.7 GPa (closed circles), together with those of branch a in LaIn3 (open circles) (Ref. 38) (a) and ThIn3 (Ref. 59) (b). Solid lines connecting the data are visual guides.

Image of FIG. 121.
FIG. 121.

Temperature dependence of the upper critical field Hc 2 in CeIn3 at 2.68 GPa, cited from Ref. 38.

Image of FIG. 122.
FIG. 122.

Theoretical Fermi surfaces in LaRhIn5 (CeRhIn5) (a) and CeCoIn5 (b), cited from Ref. 78. Small Fermi surfaces are not shown.

Image of FIG. 123.
FIG. 123.

dHvA oscillation at 0 GPa in CeRhIn5 (a) and its FFT spectrum (b), together with the FFT spectrum in a non-4f reference compound LaRhIn5 (c), cited from Ref. 78.

Image of FIG. 124.
FIG. 124.

dHvA oscillation at 2.9 GPa in CeRhIn5 (a) and its FFT spectrum (b), together with the FFT spectrum in CeCoIn5 at ambient pressure (c), cited from Ref. 78.

Image of FIG. 125.
FIG. 125.

Pressure dependence of dHvA frequency (a) and cyclotron mass (b) in CeRhIn5, cited from Ref. 78.

Image of FIG. 126.
FIG. 126.

Crystal and magnetic structure of CePt3Si (a), and the crystal structure of CeIrSi3 (b), which also lack inversion symmetry along the [001] direction.

Image of FIG. 127.
FIG. 127.

Spherical Fermi surface with degenerated up (↑) and down (↓) spin states (a), and the Fermi surface and the corresponding energy bands are split into two components depending on the up and down spin states when the magnetic field H is applied to the material. The maximum cross-sectional areas SF are also split into two components as a function of the magnetic field, well known as Zeeman splitting (b). The Fermi surface and the corresponding energy band are split into two components depending on the up and down spin states due to the antisymmetric spin-orbit interaction even when H = 0. The field dependence of the maximum cross-sectional areas SF and SF + are also shown in the non-centrosymmetric structure (c).

Image of FIG. 128.
FIG. 128.

Typical dHvA oscillation for H||[001] (a) and its FFT spectrum (b) in LaIrSi3, cited from Ref. 23.

Image of FIG. 129.
FIG. 129.

Angular dependence of the dHvA frequency (a) and theoretical angular dependence (b) in LaIrSi3, cited from Ref. 23.

Image of FIG. 130.
FIG. 130.

Theoretical Fermi surfaces in LaIrSi3, cited from Ref. 23.

Image of FIG. 131.
FIG. 131.

Angular dependence of the dHvA frequency in LaIrGe3 (a) and LaIrSi3 (b), cited from Ref. 26.

Image of FIG. 132.
FIG. 132.

Angular dependence of the dHvA frequency in LaCoGe3 (a), LaRhGe3 (b) and LaIrGe3 (c), cited from Ref. 26.

Image of FIG. 133.
FIG. 133.

Radial wave function rφ(r) as a function of the distance r for Ir-5d, Rh-4d and Co-3d electrons in the isolated atoms, cited from Ref. 26.

Image of FIG. 134.
FIG. 134.

Coupling constant of the spin-orbit interaction (dV(r)/dr)r 2 (a) and the spin-orbit interaction Iso as a function of the distance r (b) for Ir-5d, Rh-4d and Co-3d electrons in the isolated atoms, cited from Ref. 26.

Image of FIG. 135.
FIG. 135.

-dependence of the Néel temperature (a) and the γ value (b) in CeTSi3 and CeTGe3 (T: Co, Rh, Ir), cited from Refs. 23, 176, 189, and 190.

Image of FIG. 136.
FIG. 136.

Pressure dependences of the Néel temperature TN and superconducting transition temperature Tsc (a), specific heat jump ΔCac /Cac (Tsc ) (b), cited from Ref. 192, and the upper critical field Hc 2(0) for H||[001] (c) in CeIrSi3, cited from Ref. 191.

Image of FIG. 137.
FIG. 137.

Temperature dependence of upper critical field Hc 2 for the magnetic field along [001] at 2.60 GPa, together with those at 2.65 GPa in CeIrSi3, cited from Ref. 191.

Image of FIG. 138.
FIG. 138.

dHvA oscillations in the superconducting mixed states of CeRu2,195 CeCoIn5,79 URu2Si2,196 and UPd2Al3.197

Tables

Generic image for table
Table I.

Single crystal growth and Fermi surface studies in cerium compounds, which indicate a wide variety of electronic states such as paramagnetism including Pauli paramagnetism, denoted as (P), quadrupolar ordering (Q) including multipolar ordering, ferromagnetism (F), antiferromagnetism (AF), and superconductivity (S).

Generic image for table
Table II.

Single crystal growth and Fermi surface studies in thorium.

Generic image for table
Table III.

Single crystal growth and Fermi surface studies in uranium compounds.

Generic image for table
Table IV.

Single crystal growth and Fermi surface studies in transuranium compounds.

Generic image for table
Table V.

Magnetic properties, dHvA frequency and the corresponding cyclotron mass for H||〈100〉 (only branch j for H||〈111〉) in RIn3,39–42,45–50 ScGa3 and LuGa3.55

Generic image for table
Table VI.

Numbers of valence electrons and Fermi surface studies in the RX3 and AnX3 compounds with the AuCu3-type cubic crystal structure.

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Table VII.

Number of valence electrons and Fermi surface studies in RTX5 and AnTX5 compounds with the HoCoGa5-type tetragonal structure.

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Table VIII.

Superconducting properties of CeRhIn5 at 2.45 GPa, CeCoIn5, PuRhGa5 and NpPd5Al2, cited from Refs. 94, 79, 21, and 96.

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Table IX.

Experimental dHvA frequency F, the cyclotron mass , and the antisymmetric spin-orbit interaction 2|αp | for H||[001] in LaTX3 (T = Co, Rh, Ir and X = Si, Ge) and PrCoGe3, cited from Ref. 26.

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2012-03-01
2014-04-19
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: de Haas–van Alphen effect and Fermi surface properties in rare earth and actinide compounds (Review Article)
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/ltp/38/2/10.1063/1.3683408
10.1063/1.3683408
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