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Effects of cytoskeletal disruption on transport, structure, and rheology within mammalian cells
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10.1063/1.2795130
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    Affiliations:
    1 Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA
    2 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Department of Physics and Astronomy, and California NanoSystems Institute, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA
    3 Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, California NanoSystems Institute, Institute for Cell Mimetic Studies, Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research, and Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA
    a) Author to whom correspondence should be addressed. Present address: Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000, Israel. Telephone: 972-4-829-4134. Fax: 972-4-829-4599. Electronic mail: daphnew@tx.technion.ac.il
    b) Author to whom correspondence should be addressed. Telephone: 310-206-6754. Fax: 310-267-0382. Electronic mail: mteitell@mednet.ucla.edu
    Phys. Fluids 19, 103102 (2007); http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.2795130
/content/aip/journal/pof2/19/10/10.1063/1.2795130
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/pof2/19/10/10.1063/1.2795130
View: Figures

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Particle tracking microrheology with diameter fluorescent polymer spheres embedded within NIH3T3 fibroblast cells. (a) trajectories of typical transport in NIH3T3 cells. The approximate speeds of particles (2) and (3), calculated by end-to-end displacement, are 18 and , respectively. Particle 1 shows a partial trajectory that continues past the top of the figure. (b) Time-dependent mean-square displacements (MSDs) of the particles in (a). All the particles exhibit directional motion correlated to cell crawling (arrow).

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Average probe transport characteristics as a function of incubation time, , in nocodazole, averaged over trajectories of particles in 15 cells. (a) Percent of the number of particles exhibiting locally trapped to subdiffusive motion in nocodazole, averaged over hundreds of particles. (b) Probed microdomain diameter in which particles become trapped, assuming a spherical cage, averaged over tens of particles.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Effective creep compliance, , proportional to the measured MSD, as a function of correlation time, , in nocodazole. (a) Typical for three particles at waiting times . The represented particles are the same as in Fig. 1. At long times, , the log-slope , but this cannot be interpreted as a viscosity because caged diffusion is modified by the ballistic motion of cell crawling. (b) Typical of three particles, not the same particles as in (a), after in nocodazole. At long times, the log-slope , corresponding to caged diffusion and the disappearance of cell crawling. Corresponding trap diameters, calculated as for use in Fig. 2(b), are as follows from top to bottom: 202, 187, and , respectively.

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/content/aip/journal/pof2/19/10/10.1063/1.2795130
2007-10-10
2014-04-16
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Effects of cytoskeletal disruption on transport, structure, and rheology within mammalian cells
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/pof2/19/10/10.1063/1.2795130
10.1063/1.2795130
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