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Numerical study on the motion of microscopic oil droplets in high intensity isotropic turbulence
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10.1063/1.2946445
/content/aip/journal/pof2/20/7/10.1063/1.2946445
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/pof2/20/7/10.1063/1.2946445

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

The Friedman and Katz (Ref. 1) experimentally determined quiescent rise velocity for slightly buoyant oil droplets. “Analysis fuel” refers to slightly buoyant fuel oil (used with permission).

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

The Friedman and Katz (Ref. 1) large facility L3 experimentally determined turbulent rise velocity, normalized by quiescent rise velocity, for slightly buoyant oil droplets in isotropic turbulence. Histogram reference to right scale shows number of droplets in analysis bin of . Data points (◇) referenced to left scale show mean rise rate (used with permission).

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

The Friedman and Katz (Ref. 1) experimentally determined turbulence rise data for slightly buoyant oil droplets in large facility L3 compared with quiescent rise approximation using Feng and Michaelides (Ref. 9) with viscosity ratio of 6.41. Upper horizontal scale shows droplet diameter normalized by Kolmogorov microscale, .

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Stirred tank settling velocity normalized by unstirred tank settling velocity, , vs the Kolmogorov microscale normalized by particle diameter, (Nocentini and Magelli, Ref. 10). Upper horizontal scale shows particle diameter normalized by the Kolmogorov microscale, .

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

The Friedman and Katz (Ref. 1) experimentally determined quiescent rise data for slightly buoyant oil droplets compared with numerical approximation using Feng and Michaelides (Ref. 9) .

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Standard sphere and Feng and Michaelides (Ref. 9) for fuel oil in water vs Reynolds number.

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

The Kurose and Komori (adapted from Ref. 23) lift coefficient for a stationary sphere in linear shear flow: (△) , (◻) , (◇) , and (▽) . is dimensionless shear.

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

The Friedman and Katz (Ref. 1) experimentally determined turbulence rise data for slightly buoyant oil droplets compared with baseline numerical approximation using Feng and Michaelides (Ref. 9) and Kurose and Komori (Ref. 23) . Upper horizontal scale shows droplet diameter normalized by the Kolmogorov microscale, .

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

Simulation results for various combinations of lift and drag coefficients compared with experimental turbulent rise results of Friedman and Katz (Ref. 1). Upper horizontal scale shows droplet diameter normalized by the Kolmogorov microscale, .

Image of FIG. 10.
FIG. 10.

pdfs of the droplet lift force in the vertical direction, , vs droplet radius.

Image of FIG. 11.
FIG. 11.

Simulation results for Basset force with time history of , 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 compared with experimental turbulent rise results of Friedman and Katz (Ref. 1). is the Kolmogorov time scale. All simulations used Feng and Michaelides (Ref. 9) , Kurose and Komori (Ref. 23) , and . Upper horizontal scale shows droplet diameter normalized by the Kolmogorov microscale, .

Image of FIG. 12.
FIG. 12.

Standard drag curve and selected experimental drag curves for relative turbulence intensity (adapted from Crowe et al., Ref. 19).

Image of FIG. 13.
FIG. 13.

based on relative and terminal droplet velocity vs oil droplet diameter for the simulation of the Friedman and Katz (Ref. 1) large facility L3 with . Upper horizontal scale shows droplet diameter normalized by the Kolmogorov microscale, .

Image of FIG. 14.
FIG. 14.

Variation in vs and following Uhlherr and Sinclair (Ref. 44).

Image of FIG. 15.
FIG. 15.

Modified correlations used vs and mean turbulence intensity .

Image of FIG. 16.
FIG. 16.

Simulation results for variation in due to mean turbulence intensity compared with experimental turbulent rise results of Friedman and Katz (Ref. 1). Upper horizontal scale shows droplet diameter normalized by the Kolmogorov microscale, .

Image of FIG. 17.
FIG. 17.

Modified used vs droplet radius. Upper horizontal scale shows droplet diameter normalized by the Kolmogorov microscale, .

Image of FIG. 18.
FIG. 18.

Simulation results for variation in and due to mean turbulence intensity compared with experimental turbulent rise results of Friedman and Katz (Ref. 1). Modified is that shown in Fig. 17. Upper horizontal scale shows droplet diameter normalized by the Kolmogorov microscale, .

Tables

Generic image for table
Table I.

Turbulent field modeled. is the side length of the domain, is the characteristic length scale, is the characteristic velocity, is the characteristic time scale, is the Kolmogorov time scale, is the integral time scale, is the Kolmogorov microscale, is the Taylor length scale, and is the dissipation rate.

Generic image for table
Table II.

Simulation results using the Feng and Michaelides (Ref. 9) and Kurose and Komori (Ref. 23) . , , , and are, respectively, minimum lift force in the vertical direction, maximum lift force in the vertical direction, mean lift force in the vertical direction, and total lift force (all in N). is mean lift force in the vertical direction normalized by magnitude of mean drag force. is mean lift force normalized by magnitude of mean drag force.

Generic image for table
Table III.

Normalized time scales (value for calculated for radii droplets).

Generic image for table
Table IV.

Experimentally observed behavior and Stokes number St for heavy particles experiencing relative turbulence intensity . is the particle diameter, is the Kolmogorov microscale, is the particle density, and is the carrier fluid density.

Generic image for table
Table V.

Properties and observed behavior of plastic and marble spheres settling in a stirred tank under high (Schwartzberg and Treybal, Ref. 57). is the particle diameter, is the particle density, is the carrier fluid density, is the relative turbulence intensity, is the settling velocity in a stirred tank, and is the settling velocity in a still tank.

Generic image for table
Table VI.

Experimentally observed behavior and Stokes number St for heavy particles in oscillating flows. is the particle diameter, is the oscillation amplitude, is the particle density, is the carrier fluid density, and is the relative oscillation intensity.

Generic image for table
Table VII.

Experimentally observed behavior for heavy particles vs or . is the particle diameter, is the particle density, is the carrier fluid density, is the relative turbulence intensity, is the stirred tank settling velocity, is the unstirred tank settling velocity, and is the Kolmogorov microscale. (Note: estimated from .)

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/content/aip/journal/pof2/20/7/10.1063/1.2946445
2008-07-01
2014-04-23
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Numerical study on the motion of microscopic oil droplets in high intensity isotropic turbulence
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/pof2/20/7/10.1063/1.2946445
10.1063/1.2946445
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