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Particle motion between parallel walls: Hydrodynamics and simulation
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10.1063/1.3487748
/content/aip/journal/pof2/22/10/10.1063/1.3487748
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/pof2/22/10/10.1063/1.3487748
View: Figures

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

A single spherical particle of radius in a channel of width . The vector is centered on the particle which lies a fractional distance across the channel.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

The components of the translation-force coupling in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the walls, respectively.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

The components of the translation-torque coupling. The contribution is not singular and therefore makes no contribution to the single wall problem.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

The components of the translation-stresslet coupling corresponding to couples between translation parallel to the walls and the stresslet and translation perpendicular to the walls and stresslets with components parallel to the walls as well as translation perpendicular to the wall and the stresslet via superposition.

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

The components of the rotation-torque coupling about the axes parallel and perpendicular to the walls, respectively.

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

The components of the rotation-stresslet coupling which relates rotation of a particle about the axes parallel to the walls to the stresslet.

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

The components of the rate of strain-stresslet coupling. Between two walls, there are only three independent components of the tensor corresponding to the necessary Stokes flow symmetries and the anisotropy caused by the wall.

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

The components of the exact translation-force coupling and the translation-force coupling determined using Oseen’s superposition approximation as well as the relative error between this and the Stokesian dynamics results.

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

The fall speed, , and rotation rate, , of a particle sedimenting along a channel. The fall speed and rotation rate are normalized by the Stokes velocity of the same particle subject to the same force in an otherwise unbounded fluid (i.e., and ).

Image of FIG. 10.
FIG. 10.

The fall speed, , of a particle sedimenting along a channel normalized by the Stokes velocity of the same particle subject to the same force in an otherwise unbounded fluid (i.e., ).

Image of FIG. 11.
FIG. 11.

The fraction of the channel over which a particle sediments at 95% of its midchannel fall speed.

Image of FIG. 12.
FIG. 12.

The drift velocity of a single Brownian particle in channel of width plotted as a function of height above the lower channel wall.

Image of FIG. 13.
FIG. 13.

The additional contribution to the viscosity of a dilute suspension, , is plotted against the separation between the channel walls. The superposition approximation due to Guth and Simha is also plotted.

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/content/aip/journal/pof2/22/10/10.1063/1.3487748
2010-10-11
2014-04-24
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Particle motion between parallel walls: Hydrodynamics and simulation
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/pof2/22/10/10.1063/1.3487748
10.1063/1.3487748
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