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Inertia dominated thin-film flows over microdecorated surfaces
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10.1063/1.3454769
/content/aip/journal/pof2/22/7/10.1063/1.3454769
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/pof2/22/7/10.1063/1.3454769
View: Figures

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Schematic of thin-film flow over rough substrates. (a) When the thickness of the film is large compared to the wavelength of the topographical features , the influence of flow through the roughness is captured by the slip velocity in the plane defined by the dotted line. (b) When is smaller than , the thickness of the film and the position of the free surface become nonuniform. (c) When is of the same order as , the roughness is modeled using a slip boundary condition, which modifies the development of the viscous boundary layer, as discussed in this paper.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

(a) Schematic representation of a unit cell of the square lattice in the plane defined by the top of the posts. On the posts, there is no slip as the liquid flows on a solid substrate. Between the posts, the liquid flows on top of a liquid layer, so the fluid velocity is nonzero (modelled by an effective slip boundary condition). (b) Schematic representation of the thin-film flow over a square lattice of cylindrical posts of radius and height , typically . and are, respectively, the thickness and the total flow rate of the liquid layer. is referred to as the leakage flow rate through the texture.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Definition of for square (a) and hexagonal (b) lattices. Each lattice is defined by its unit cell, and represented here in the plane defined by the top of the posts, i.e., at the composite interface. is the angle between the direction of the flow, indicated by the black arrow and the main axis of the lattice (white arrow). The projected segment lines of total length are represented in gray. The effective slip length is assumed proportional to , the total length of the black segment lines. The angular dependence of is represented for a square (c) and a hexagonal lattice (d). The two dotted lines correspond to values of equal to 200 and . Lattice parameters are as follows: lattice spacing , post radius , and post height .

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Schematic representation of the two-dimensional thin-film flow. The discontinuous line delimits the boundary layer of thickness .

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

(a) Experimental setup and (b) image of a circular hydraulic jump, indicated by an arrow on the photograph, formed upon impact of a water jet on a smooth substrate (the total flow rate and the jet radius ). The jet impacts a smooth substrate, which presents a circle of diameter 5 cm centered on the impact point of the jet. The circle delimits the region that is removable to permit the study of the surface roughness effects [indicated in dark gray on the horizontal plate shown in (a)].

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

Evolution of flow properties for a slip coefficient varying between 0 (no slip) and 5 [slip length equal to ]. (a) Self-similar solution at . The velocity at the composite interface increases with the slip coefficient. (b) Difference between and : the value of is smaller for larger values of the slip coefficient.

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

Evolution of flow properties, and , reported in for a slip coefficient varying between 0 (no slip) and 5 [slip length equal to ]. (a) . (b) Thickness of the boundary layer for a radial position . We use parameters whose values are typical of the experimental study described in Sec. III: , , and . We chose for . The curves correspond to composite substrates characterized by a leakage flow parameter varying between 0 (bottom curve) and 0.5 (top curve) in increments of 0.1. The thickness of the boundary layer above a smooth substrate is equal to (Ref. 25).

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

Photographs of polygonal hydraulic jumps observed on microtextured substrates: (a) hexagonal lattice and (b) square lattice. The parameters of the water jets are and . The lattice parameters are , , and . The insets are photographs of the lattices of posts.

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

Photographs of polygonal hydraulic jumps observed on a square lattice (, , and ). The radius of the liquid jet is . Different viscosities are obtained by adding glycerol to water: (a) 0 wt % glycerol, , and . (b) 10 wt % glycerol, , and . (c) 20 wt % glycerol, , and . (d) 40 wt % glycerol, , and .

Image of FIG. 10.
FIG. 10.

Influence of the surface tension on the size of the jumps: photographs of polygonal hydraulic jumps over a square lattice (, , and ) for two different surface tensions. Liquid jets have the same radius . The addition of SDS at a concentration equal to the CMC leads to a reduction in surface tension from (a) for pure water to (b) .

Image of FIG. 11.
FIG. 11.

Influence of the location of the posts on the shape of the jump. Photographs of polygonal hydraulic jumps over square lattice of posts (, , and ). The parameters of the water jets are and . In (a) and (b), the surface area covered by microposts is indicated by the dashed lines. The patterned disc is rotated around the water jet, which remains fixed. (c) Microtextured stripe of width 2 mm and length 5 cm. (d) Complementary coverage to that of (a) and (b): the microtexture covers the whole disc of diameter 5 cm except for the disc sector used in (a) and (b).

Image of FIG. 12.
FIG. 12.

Influence of the surface area covered by posts on jumps. Photographs of polygonal hydraulic jumps over substrates with different coverages by the microtexture. The surface area covered by the posts is delimited by a dashed line. The parameters of the square lattice are , , and , and the parameters of the water jets are equal to and . The microtextured surface is centered on the impact point and covers (a) a disc of diameter 5 cm, (b) a disc of diameter 1.25 cm, and (c) a square of side length 2.5 cm.

Image of FIG. 13.
FIG. 13.

Jump radius as a function of the applied flow rate: photographs of polygonal hydraulic jumps over a square lattice (, , and ). The parameters of the water jets are for a total flow rate of (a) , (b) , and (c) .

Image of FIG. 14.
FIG. 14.

Photographs of hydraulic jumps over (a) smooth substrate and (b) square lattice of posts (, , and ). The dotted line indicates the mean radius of the jump on the smooth substrates. Some corners of the polygonal jump are located outside the circle delimited by the dotted line. The water jet parameters are and .

Image of FIG. 15.
FIG. 15.

Influence of the shape of the posts on the jumps: photographs of polygonal hydraulic jumps over square lattices (, , and ). The (a) circular, (b) square, and (c) star-shaped microposts cover a disc of diameter of 5 cm centered at the impact point. Parameters of the water jets: and a total flow rate of .

Image of FIG. 16.
FIG. 16.

Influence of topographical parameters on the jump formed from jets of water. (a) Average radius and (b) maximum deformation vs flow rate for four square lattices with post radius and different lattice spacings and post heights: (△) and , and , (▽) and , (○) and , (◻) and , and smooth substrate.

Image of FIG. 17.
FIG. 17.

Coefficients of the model determined by fitting the experimental value of and with . Leakage flow and slip length coefficients as functions of (a) the aspect ratio of the posts and (b) the roughness porosity . Symbols are identical to those in Fig. 16.

Image of FIG. 18.
FIG. 18.

Results of the modeling for square lattices of posts. (a) Evolution of the shape of the jump for increasing flow rates from left to right. Lattice parameters: post radius , lattice spacing , and post height . (b) Shapes predicted for jumps over square lattices with different lattice parameters. Symbols as in Fig. 16. In these simulations, we use the values of and determined from experimental data (Fig. 17).

Image of FIG. 19.
FIG. 19.

Results of the modeling. (a) Comparison between the results of the model (solid line) and the experimental data. The results obtained in Ref. 26 are also represented (●). (b) Maximum deformation of the shape predicted by the model. Symbols as in Fig. 16.

Image of FIG. 20.
FIG. 20.

Influence of the surface tension predicted by the model. Prediction of the shape of the jump over a square lattice with parameters , and . The parameters of the jet are and . In (a) , and in (b) .

Image of FIG. 21.
FIG. 21.

Influence of the kinematic viscosity on the results of the modeling. Prediction of the shape of the jump over a square lattice with parameters , , and . The jet is described by and and (a) , (b) , and (c) .

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/content/aip/journal/pof2/22/7/10.1063/1.3454769
2010-07-02
2014-04-19
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Inertia dominated thin-film flows over microdecorated surfaces
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/pof2/22/7/10.1063/1.3454769
10.1063/1.3454769
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