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Deformation of vortex patches by boundaries
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10.1063/1.4790809
/content/aip/journal/pof2/25/2/10.1063/1.4790809
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/pof2/25/2/10.1063/1.4790809
View: Figures

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

The motion of a vortex patch above a straight boundary is equivalent, via the method of images, to that of a vortex patch and an image vortex patch, of opposite vorticity, obtained by a reflection in the boundary.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Possible motions in the -θ plane as predicted by the elliptic model with /ω = 1/18, corresponding to / = 1.5. The contour that intersects = 1, at which point θ is undefined, represents the motion of an initially circular patch (solid line). Any contour within this circular motion contour represents a nutating motion (dotted-dashed line). Contours outside the circular motion contour represent vortex patches undergoing rotation (dashed lines). For sufficiently large values of , larger than those shown here, vortex patches are extended indefinitely.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Maximum deformation of an initially circular patch of vorticity in terms of the distance of its centroid from the boundary, as given by the elliptic model. The model predicts that the patch is extended indefinitely when / < 1.01.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Motion of an initially circular patch with centroid at = 1.5. Patch motion is from left to right at time intervals of 5/ω. Contour dynamics solution is given by solid lines, and the elliptic approximation by dashed lines.

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Even when the elliptic model is not valid, it still gives a good approximation to the region occupied by the vortex patch at short times. Here, we show the contour dynamics and elliptic model solutions with = at time intervals of 2/ω.

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

The motion of a vortex patch around a corner is equivalent, via the method of images, to that of a vortex patch and its image vortex patches obtained by reflection in the boundaries = 0 and = 0. The two image vortex patches obtained from a single reflection have the opposite vorticity to the original patch, the third image patch has the same vorticity.

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

Evolution of an initially circular vortex patch in a quarter plane with initial centroid (1.5, 100). The time origin = 0 is defined to occur when = . (a) Path of the patch centroid. (b) Variation of elliptic shape with time. Far away from the corner, the patch undergoes a periodic motion associated with the evolution of a patch above a straight boundary. The periodic evolution of the patch shape before and after the corner is almost exactly the same.

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

(a) Evolution of the action for the motion shown in Figure 7 . The values of before and after the corner interaction are almost exactly the same. (b) The difference in action Δ before and after the corner is shown for patches whose centroid speed is modified by a factor of α. These values of Δ are calculated from a root mean square average over of the difference in action for all vortex patches with the same initial action and energy (and consequently separation from the wall) as the patch shown in Figure 7 . The difference Δ decreases exponentially as α is increased (corresponding to ε being decreased), which is consistent with adiabatic behaviour.

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

(a) Streamlines for the irrotational background flow Ψ(, ) = β. (b) Paths of patch centroids under the point vortex approximation for the case β = −0.028ω. Whenever β/ω < 0, a stagnation point exists, and vortex patches are trapped in the corner region.

Image of FIG. 10.
FIG. 10.

Poincaré sections in the - plane of forward intersections with θ = 0. The strain rate is β = −0.028ω and two different values of are considered. (a) /(ω ) = −0.44. The Poincaré section closely matches the earlier point vortex paths. (b) /(ω ) = −0.27. The Poincaré section reveals chaotic behaviour. Resonances have opened up in some of the previously circular contours, and a “sea of chaos” has formed around the edge of the region.

Image of FIG. 11.
FIG. 11.

Motion of a vortex patch, initially circular with centroid ( − 2.5, 0), around an island of radius = . The motion is visualised by snapshots of the patch location at time intervals of 40/ω for the elliptic model (dashed line) and the full contour dynamics solution (solid line). The path of the centroid under the elliptic model is also shown (grey line).

Image of FIG. 12.
FIG. 12.

Maximum deformation of an initially circular patch of vorticity in terms of the initial separation of its centroid from the boundary, (0) − , as given by the elliptic model. Larger islands lead to more deformation, and, in the limit → ∞ the result for deformation above a straight boundary is recovered. Solutions with (0) − < are unphysical since the vortex patch overlaps with the island.

Image of FIG. 13.
FIG. 13.

(a) Streamlines for the irrotational background flow Ψ(, ) = (1 − ( + )) around an island of size = . (b) Paths of patch centroid under point vortex approximation with = and /(ω) = 0.1. The separatrix (heavy line) splits the motion into three regions: vortices passing below the island, vortices passing above the island, and vortices orbiting the island. This separation into three regions is generic and does not depend on the strength of the vortex.

Image of FIG. 14.
FIG. 14.

Motion of initially circular vortex patches past an island of the same size ( = ) calculated using the elliptic model. The irrotational background flow has strength /(ω) = 0.1. The motion of vortex patches is shown for three different values of the release height . Each motion is visualised by the path of the ellipse centroid alongside snapshots of the elliptic shape at time intervals of 10/ω.

Image of FIG. 15.
FIG. 15.

Maximum deformation of elliptic vortex patches with the same size as the island ( = ) over a range of background flow strengths and release heights . The region of parameter space for which vortex patches are indefinitely extended is shaded in dark grey. Elsewhere, contours of are shown. For further information, the location of the separatrix for point vortices is shown (heavy line) as is the location of the island (light grey shaded region).

Image of FIG. 16.
FIG. 16.

Motion of vortex patches with varying release heights driven towards an island by background flow; each panel shows a lower release height than the one before. The island and the patch have the same area, and the background flow has strength /(ω) = 0.1. Solutions were calculated using the elliptic model (dashed lines) and using contour dynamics (solid lines). The patch motion is visualised by snapshots of the patch position at intervals of 10/ω. In (a), the patch passes above the island and the elliptic model ( = 1.53) is in good agreement with the full solution; there is similar agreement in (f) when the patch passes below the island ( = 1.30). For intermediate release heights (b)–(e), the elliptic model predicts indefinite extension, as shown in (b). For these intermediate heights, the patch is either deformed into a non-elliptical shape while passing the island before returning to an approximately circular shape downstream (b), (c), (e); or the patch is extended around both sides of the island (d).

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/content/aip/journal/pof2/25/2/10.1063/1.4790809
2013-02-13
2014-04-25
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Deformation of vortex patches by boundaries
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/pof2/25/2/10.1063/1.4790809
10.1063/1.4790809
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