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Integrated two-dimensional simulations of dynamic hohlraum driven inertial fusion capsule implosions
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10.1063/1.2354587
/content/aip/journal/pop/13/10/10.1063/1.2354587
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/pop/13/10/10.1063/1.2354587
View: Figures

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

(Color) A 3D schematic of the dynamic hohlraum configuration.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

A 2D schematic of the dynamic hohlraum geometry used for the integrated simulations.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

The drive current is plotted as a function of time both from a typical shot and as computed in a 2D integrated simulation of a dynamic hohlraum implosion.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

(Color) Plots of the material locations for three different times in an integrated simulation of a dynamic hohlraum with a capsule imbedded in the foam convertor. The tungsten is black, the convertor is green, the is red, and the capsule CH shell and the gold electrode are both yellow.

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

(Color) Electron and radiation temperatures at the time when the tungsten has reached the original outer radius of the convertor (a) 2D contour plots and (b) 1D plots at the equator as a function of radius.

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

(Color) Plots of various quantities as a function of time. The curves are the results from the integrated simulations. The symbols are the ex-perimentally measured results. The hohlraum brightness temperature is black, the shock position is green, and the capsule radii are red.

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

(Color) The results of a radiation driven capsule simulation as calculated using the HYDRA code are plotted as a function of radius, density (blue), radiation temperature (red), and electron temperature (green). The plots are at three times during the simulation: (a) , (b) , (c) .

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

(Color) Peak CH ablator density, mass averaged deuterium fuel density, peak deuterium ion temperature, and mass averaged deuterium ion temperature, as calculated in a HYDRA simulation, are plotted as a function of time.

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

The deuterium/ablator interface, shock position within the deuterium, and the neutron production rate, as calculated in a HYDRA simulation, are plotted as a function of time.

Image of FIG. 10.
FIG. 10.

Neutron yields from diameter CH capsules filled with gas are plotted as a function of capsule shell thickness. The circles are the results obtained from 2D integrated simulations without any perturbations in the wire array, “clean 2D.” The stars are the best experimental results and the squares are the average experimental yields. The error bars are one sigma calculated from the variation in the yields.

Image of FIG. 11.
FIG. 11.

Neutron yields from CH capsules, with a shell thickness of , filled with gas are plotted as a function of capsule diameter. The circles are the results of 2D integrated simulations and the squares are the average experimental yields.

Image of FIG. 12.
FIG. 12.

Geometries for simulating inhomogeneous foams. (a) Periodic thin disks; (b) random flakes.

Image of FIG. 13.
FIG. 13.

(Color) Contour plots from an integrated 2D simulation showing the materials at two different times during the implosions, (a) , and (b) . The density of the outer wire-array plasma was perturbed cell to cell with amplitudes of 0.35% to seed the Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

Image of FIG. 14.
FIG. 14.

The Rosseland optical depth through the wire-array plasma is plotted as a function of the axial position, . These results are for the same simulation shown in the previous figure. The solid curve is for and the dotted curve is for .

Image of FIG. 15.
FIG. 15.

The ensemble averaged radiation temperatures at the capsule surface from integrated simulations with three different levels of perturbations are plotted as a function of time.

Image of FIG. 16.
FIG. 16.

(Color) The average neutron yields (circles) from a series of simulations with diameter capsules are plotted as a function of the perturbation amplitude. The vertical bars indicate the 1 sigma variation of 9 simulated yields with different initial random number seeds. The circles are the average of these yields. The dashed horizontal lines indicate the best experimental yields. Black curves are for and red curves are for thick shells.

Image of FIG. 17.
FIG. 17.

(Color) The average of the peak mass averaged fuel densities, from the same series of simulations as Fig. 16, is plotted as a function of the perturbation amplitude. The vertical bars indicate the 1 sigma variation of 9 simulated peak mass averaged fuel densities with different initial random number seeds. The circles are the average of these peak mass averaged densities. The dashed horizontal lines indicate the spectroscopically inferred fuel densities. Black curves are for and red curves are for thick shells.

Image of FIG. 18.
FIG. 18.

(Color) The average of the peak mass averaged fuel electron temperatures, from the same series of simulations as Fig. 16, is plotted as a function of the perturbation amplitude. The vertical bars indicate the 1 sigma variation of 9 simulated peak mass averaged fuel electron temperatures with different initial random number seeds. The circles are the average of these peak mass averaged electron temperatures. The dashed horizontal lines indicate the spectroscopically inferred fuel temperatures. Black curves are for and red curves are for thick shells.

Image of FIG. 19.
FIG. 19.

The ratios of the experimentally measured neutron yields over the unperturbed (clean 2D) integrated simulations are plotted for several capsule shell compositions and thicknesses. The surface roughness of these capsules decreases to the right.

Image of FIG. 20.
FIG. 20.

(Color) Contour plots of the ion temperature (left) and the density (right) from a HYDRA simulation of a thick diameter CH capsule with a surface roughness of approximately RMS at different times during the implosion.

Image of FIG. 21.
FIG. 21.

The amplitude of the second Legendre mode of the radiation flux at a capsule in an integrated simulation is plotted as a function of time. The radiation temperature at the capsule is also plotted for comparison.

Image of FIG. 22.
FIG. 22.

The ratios of the fuel radius at the equator to the fuel radius at the pole, as calculated by integrated 2D simulations at the times of peak electron temperature, are plotted as a function of the capsule shell thickness. The capsules had a diameter of .

Image of FIG. 23.
FIG. 23.

The ratios of the fuel radius at the equator to the fuel radius at the pole at the time of peak electron temperatures are plotted as a function of the magnitude of the second Legendre mode, . These results were obtained from 2D simulations of capsules driven with a time dependent radiation drive taken from the integrated simulations, but with a time independent asymmetry .

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/content/aip/journal/pop/13/10/10.1063/1.2354587
2006-10-06
2014-04-18
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Integrated two-dimensional simulations of dynamic hohlraum driven inertial fusion capsule implosions
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/pop/13/10/10.1063/1.2354587
10.1063/1.2354587
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