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Effect of high-voltage nanosecond pulses on complex plasmas
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10.1063/1.3254366
/content/aip/journal/pop/16/11/10.1063/1.3254366
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/pop/16/11/10.1063/1.3254366
View: Figures

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Arrangement of the electrodes in the HV nanopulse experiment. The HV electrode is mounted coaxially with the confinement ring in order to provide a common axial symmetry of the confinement.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Temporal evolution of the voltage on the rf electrode after a single HV nanosecond pulse. Discharge parameters: , . designates the moment of the pulse launch.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

Dependence of instability growth rate on the pulse repetition rate and amplitude for the cluster of 14 particles at , . The inset shows the evolution of the horizontal kinetic energy of the dust particles for the conditions of maximal at . For the unstable cluster of two microparticles similar evolution of energy and behavior of is observed.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

Spectra of horizontal (solid line) and vertical (squares) oscillations of the microparticle for 2 (a) and 14 (b) particle clusters. For horizontal oscillations the spectrum is obtained as a power spectrum of the total horizontal kinetic energy . Note that kinetic energy is proportional to velocity squared and therefore is peaked at a double frequency of the cluster mode. is therefore determined as the frequency, corresponding to the highest peak, divided by 2. For vertical oscillations a resonance curve is measured by varying the pulse repetition rate . is the amplitude of the microparticle oscillations. For two particles , , and , driven at the frequency . For 14 particles , , and , driven at the frequency .

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Evolution of the surface potential of a microparticle according to the Eqs. (1)–(3) at different secondary emission yields . At the potential increases about 15% in absolute value. The relaxation time of the surface potential may be estimated as .

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/content/aip/journal/pop/16/11/10.1063/1.3254366
2009-11-12
2014-04-16
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Effect of high-voltage nanosecond pulses on complex plasmas
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/pop/16/11/10.1063/1.3254366
10.1063/1.3254366
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