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Highly efficient accelerator of dense matter using laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration
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10.1063/1.4714660
/content/aip/journal/pop/19/5/10.1063/1.4714660
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/pop/19/5/10.1063/1.4714660
View: Figures

Figures

Image of FIG. 1.
FIG. 1.

Two geometries of laser-driven accelerators of dense matter using LICPA: (a) the cylindrical accelerator and (b) the conical accelerator.

Image of FIG. 2.
FIG. 2.

Replicas of craters produced in the massive Al targets by plasma projectiles accelerated in the LICPA and AA schemes with cylindrical and conical geometry. For the cylindrical geometry, the target was lt = 20 μm CH foil, and LCh = 2 mm, dc = 0.3 mm, Lc = 0.1 mm, dh = 0.15 mm. For the conical geometry, the target was lt = 25 μm CD2 foil, with rt = 2 mm, LCh = 2 mm, Lc = 0.4 mm, d1 = dc = 0.45 mm, d2 = 0.15 mm, dh = 0.23 mm. All the accelerators were made of Au.

Image of FIG. 3.
FIG. 3.

The volume of craters produced by the plasma projectile in the massive Al target, as a function of laser energy, for the cylindrical LICPA and AA schemes, with the same parameters as in Fig. 2. Circles, squares, and diamonds with error bars represent experimental data, while smaller bullets connected by solid lines represent numerical hydrodynamic simulations. Note that the crater volumes for AA are magnified by the factor 10 in the figure.

Image of FIG. 4.
FIG. 4.

The volume of craters produced by the plasma projectile in the massive Al target, as a function of laser energy, for the conical LICPA and AA schemes with the same parameters as in Fig. 2. Note that the crater volumes for AA are magnified by the factor 10 in the figure.

Image of FIG. 5.
FIG. 5.

Temperature distributions of the Al target in the final stage of crater formation by the impact of the plasma projectile accelerated in the LICPA or in the AA cylindrical schemes with the same parameters as in Fig. 2. The gray boundary between the blue and the dark-blue region is the boundary between the melted and the solid part of the target.

Image of FIG. 6.
FIG. 6.

The electron isodensitograms and the space profiles of electron distributions for the plasma flowing out of the channel in the LICPA and AA cylindrical schemes recorded 23 ns after the target irradiation. CD2 target of lt = 25 μm, LCh = 2 mm, dc = 0.3 mm, Lc = 0.2 mm, dh = 0.15 mm. 3ω laser beam of EL = 177 J for LICPA and 180 J for AA. Note that the plasma driven by LICPA is faster and carriers much more electrons and ions than that driven by AA.

Image of FIG. 7.
FIG. 7.

Plasma outflow velocity as a function of time for the plasma flowing out of the channel in the LICPA and AA cylindrical schemes with the same parameters as in Fig. 6. Note that the outflow velocity for AA scheme is magnified by the factor 10 in the figure.

Image of FIG. 8.
FIG. 8.

The ion current density of plasma driven by the 3ω laser beam in the LICPA and AA cylindrical schemes (of parameters as in Fig. 6) as well as of the plasma produced at the direct interaction of the beam with 25-μm CD2 planar target. Note that the ion current densities for the AA scheme and the planar foil (the L-T scheme) are magnified by the factor 5 in the figure. The ion current density is by more than a factor 10 higher and the mean ion energy is by more than a factor 4 higher for LICPA than those for AA and L-T.

Image of FIG. 9.
FIG. 9.

The acceleration efficiency of plasma projectiles driven in the LICPA and AA cylindrical schemes (with parameters as in Fig. 3), as a function of laser energy. Note that the acceleration efficiency for the AA scheme is magnified by the factor 5 in the figure.

Image of FIG. 10.
FIG. 10.

Snapshots of the space distributions of the ion charge ρi and the electron charge ρe for the carbon plasma projectile accelerated in the photon pressure-driven LICPA accelerator of Lc = 120 μm and Rc = 0.64. IL = 2.5 × 1021 W/cm2, τL = 2 ps, λ = 1.06 μm, LT = 2 μm, ne = 6ni = 6 × 1023 cm−3.

Image of FIG. 11.
FIG. 11.

The ion energy spectra of plasma projectiles of various kinds of ions accelerated in the photon pressure-driven LICPA accelerator. For all kinds of ions, σh = ρLT = 4 × 10−4 g/cm2 and LT(Al+13) = 1.48 μm, LT(C6+) = 2 μm, LT(B4+) = 2.16 μm, LT(H+) = 28.6 μm. Parameters of the LICPA accelerator and the laser driver are the same as in Fig. 10.

Image of FIG. 12.
FIG. 12.

The acceleration efficiency and the mean ion energy per amu of plasma projectiles of various kinds of ions driven in the LICPA accelerator or in the conventional RPA scheme (no cavity) as predicted by PIC simulations and the generalized LS model. Parameters of the LICPA accelerator, the laser driver, and the target are the same as in Figs. 10 and 11. The acceleration length is lacc = 200 μm.

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/content/aip/journal/pop/19/5/10.1063/1.4714660
2012-05-15
2014-04-25
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752b84549af89a08dbdd7fdb8b9568b5 journal.articlezxybnytfddd
Scitation: Highly efficient accelerator of dense matter using laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration
http://aip.metastore.ingenta.com/content/aip/journal/pop/19/5/10.1063/1.4714660
10.1063/1.4714660
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